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Featured Books: Parenting & Family Life

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Adoption at the Movies: a Year of Adoption-Friendly Movie Nights to Get Your Family Talking. Addison Cooper, $25.95

Get your family talking about adoption with the ultimate collection of films to help the whole family to explore their feelings in a fun and safe way.

With a film for each week of the year, Addison Cooper has compiled the best movies, new and old, for family-friendly viewing. Among those featured are Finding Dory, Frozen, Paddington, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Kung Fu Panda, Star Wars, Divergent, The Blind Side and I am Sam. Carefully selected, the movies included will help families to comfortably talk about important adoption-related topics. They are accompanied by descriptions of the themes and ideas to get the conversations started. Helping all members of the family to explore both the pain and joy of adoption, they cover a range of issues which can arise such as culture, identity, control, and reunification. With something for everyone — from kids, to teens, to grown-ups — this is a must-have for all adoptive families.


Ahead of the Game: the Parents’ Guide to Youth Sports Concussion. Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, $20.00

Sports-related concussions, also known as mild traumatic brain injuries, have become a national epidemic. New research has shown that there is no such thing as a simple “bell-ringer,” and that sending a child back on the field too soon puts his or her physical and emotional health at risk. Yet it is all too easy to miss the warning signs of concussion, or to encourage kids to “walk off” a potentially devastating injury. Ahead of the Game is the first book to give parents of school-aged athletes the tools they need to keep kids safe on the field, court, diamond, or rink.

Ahead of the Game clearly lays out the basics of identification, management, and treatment of concussion in kids, and details the vital steps we can take to protect their most vital organ — the brain — before an injury occurs.


All You Need Is Love: Celebrating Families of All Shapes and Sizes. Shanni Collins, $21.95

All families come in different shapes and sizes, but they are all special when they love and respect each other. These rhyming stories are a celebration of the diversity of families and encourage inclusion and acceptance in a child's relationships.

By promoting diversity and understanding in family life and elsewhere, these stories support a positive approach to life at a young age, which fosters strong mental health and well-being. Each page is dedicated to a different family, with stories exploring adoption, fostering, disability, race, gender, and illness. Filled with humour and delightfully illustrated, children will love reading these stories with friends, family and in school again and again.

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The Awakened Family: a Revolution in Parenting. Shefali Tsabary, $23.00

From the author of the bestselling book The Conscious Parent

We all have the capacity to raise children who are highly resilient and emotionally connected. However, many of us are unable to because we are blinded by modern misconceptions of parenting and our own inner limitations. In The Awakened Family, Shefali Tsabary will show you how you can cultivate a relationship with your children so they can thrive; moreover, you can be transformed to a state of greater calm, compassion and wisdom as well.

This book will take you on a journey to transcending your fears and illusions around parenting and help you become the parent you always wanted to be: fully present and conscious. It will arm you with practical, hands-on strategies and real-life examples that show the extraordinary power of being a conscious parent. 


The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know About Your Baby from Birth to Age Two, Revised 2013. William Sears, Martha Sears, Robert Sears & James Sears, $29.00

An encyclopedic guide to your baby’s development and care in the first two years, this popular baby care book provides comprehensive information on virtually every aspect of infant care. The Baby Book is a rich and invaluable resource that will help you and your baby grow together.


A Baby Wants to Be Carried: Everything You Need to Know about Baby Carriers and the Benefits of Babywearing. Evelin Kirkilionis, $31.95

Carrying your baby — in a sling, wrap or other carrier — often known as 'babywearing', is more than just a convenient means of transport. In A Baby Wants to be Carried author Evelin Kirkilionis explains in detail why babies expect to be carried and respond so well to it — they have been designed for it over millions of years of human evolution. From our hunter-gather ancestors to the present day, when a vast array of baby carriers can be found in stores and on the internet, in some ways little has changed. Held close to the body of a familiar caregiver, babies thrive on the sense of security they feel as they interact — on their own terms — with their surroundings.

But modern parents must navigate their way through a mass of conflicting information about babywearing. How should a baby be carried, in what, for how long, and will it be safe? The answers can be found in these pages, as the author takes care to ensure that parents understand what to look for — and what to avoid — while making many helpful suggestions that will enable parents to make babywearing work for them. Her practical and informative approach makes the book a readable introduction to the joys of babywearing that will appeal to parents everywhere.

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Balanced and Barefoot: How Unrestricted Outdoor Play Makes for Strong, Confident, and Capable Children. Angela Hanscom, $23.95

Today’s kids have adopted sedentary lifestyles filled with television, video games, and computer screens. But more and more, studies show that children need “rough and tumble” outdoor play in order to develop their sensory, motor, and executive functions.

Using the same philosophy that lies at the heart of her popular TimberNook program — that nature is the ultimate sensory experience, and that psychological and physical health improves for children when they spend time outside on a regular basis — author Angela Hanscom offers several strategies to help children thrive, even in an urban environment.

Today it is rare to find children rolling down hills, climbing trees, or spinning in circles just for fun. We’ve taken away merry-go-rounds, shortened the length of swings, and done away with teeter-totters to keep children safe. Children have fewer opportunities for unstructured outdoor play than ever before, and recess times at school are shrinking due to demanding educational environments. With this book, you’ll discover little things you can do anytime, anywhere to help your kids achieve the movement they need to be happy and healthy in mind, body, and spirit.


Banish Boredom: Activities to Do with Kids That You'll Actually Enjoy. Rebecca Green, $27.95

Taking a lighthearted approach to the serious business of parenting, Banish Boredom helps parents find activities that they enjoy, while their children learn and have fun. Green suggests ways for parents to maintain their own identities and pursue their own interests while raising children who are creative, confident, and independent thinkers.  Although it offers valuable tips to parents, this book is not a parenting book. Rather, it’s a source of inspiration and new ideas for parents who are looking for fun and educational activities that they can do with their kids, but that are also fun and interesting for the parents themselves.  The book emphasizes adapting activities to suit the particular interests of each child, while also taking into account the personality of the parent.


Bed Timing: the "When-To" Guide to Helping Your Child to Sleep. Marc Lewis & Isabella Granic, $16.50

Teaching your baby or toddler to sleep through the night can be a bewildering and frustrating experience. Should you let your child “cry it out” or follow a “no-cry” solution? Are you tired of endless hours of rocking your baby to sleep? Why won’t your baby stay asleep? And why is last month’s no-fail bedtime routine suddenly useless?

The key to sleep success is not which approach you take; what really matters is when you use it. Because your baby is changing and developing, your sleep strategy should change too. Timing is everything. For example, the Ferber method may work well for a 6-month-old baby, but it is potentially disastrous for a 9-month-old. Bed Timing walks you through the stages of child development, from birth to 4 years, and looks at their implications for changing bedtime habits. Authoritative, sensible and packed with informative case studies, Bed Timing is the essential companion for all parents.

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Being Both: Embracing Two Religions in One Interfaith Family. Susan Katz Miller, $27.00

Susan Katz Miller grew up with a Jewish father and Christian mother, and was raised Jewish. Now in an interfaith marriage herself, she is one of the growing number of Americans who are boldly electing to raise children with both faiths, rather than in one religion or the other (or without religion). In Being Both, Miller draws on original surveys and interviews with parents, students, teachers, and clergy, as well as on her own journey, to chronicle this controversial grassroots movement. Miller argues that there are distinct benefits for families who reject the false choice of “either/or” and instead embrace the synergy of being both. Reporting on hundreds of parents and children who celebrate two religions, she documents why couples make this choice, and how children appreciate dual-faith education.

Miller includes advice and resources for interfaith families planning baby-welcoming and coming-of-age ceremonies, and seeking to find or form interfaith education programs. And finally, looking beyond Judaism and Christianity, Being Both provides the first glimpse of the next interfaith wave: intermarried Muslim, Hindu and Buddhist couples raising children in two religions. Being Both is at once a rousing declaration of the benefits of celebrating two religions, and a blueprint for interfaith families who are seeking guidance and community support. 


Being a Dad Is Weird: Lessons in Fatherhood from My Family to Yours. Ben Falcone, $31.99

Though he’s best known for his appearances in the movie Enough Said, as well as his hilarious role as Air Marshall Jon in Bridesmaids, Ben Falcone isn’t a big shot movie star director at home. There, he’s just dad. In this winning collection of stories, Ben shares his funny and poignant adventures as the husband of Melissa McCarthy, and the father of their two young daughters. He also shares tales from his own childhood in Southern Illinois, and life with his father — an outspoken, brilliant, but unconventional man with a big heart and a somewhat casual approach to employment named Steve Falcone.

Ben is just an ordinary dad who has his share of fights with other parents blocking his view with their expensive electronic devices at school performances. Navigating the complicated role of being the only male in a house full of women, he finds himself growing more and more concerned as he sounds more and more like his dad. While Steve Falcone may not have been the briefcase and gray flannel suit type, he taught Ben priceless lessons about what matters most in life. A supportive, creative, and downright funny dad, Steve made sure his sons’ lives were never dull — a sense of adventure that carries through this warm, sometimes hilarious, and poignant memoir.


Being Happy, Raising Happy: the Empowered Mom's Guide to Helping Her Spirited Child Bloom. Maureen Lake, $20.50

Designing a wellness program that honestly fits your family and lifestyle takes time, determination, and loving passion. Being Happy, Raising Happy is for loving and caring moms who somehow forgot about their own needs, desires, and the impact they want to make in the world and want to start their journey towards revitalizing the mind, body, and spirit. Maureen Lake teaches moms:

  • The reason why parenting a spirited child can cause more stress and anxiety than parenting children who don’t have the same challenges
  • The importance of cherishing themselves and setting clear boundaries so they can nurture their child
  • How to uncover the areas of their lives that are causing the most stress and anxiety
  • How to regain footing by following a five-step process toward peace of mind
  • How to better manage kids and family with a nutrition plan to increase energy and other wellness tips that boost the immune system and create better overall health

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Beyond Birds & Bees: Bringing Home a New Message to our Kids about Sex, Love, and Equality. Bonnie Rough, $20.99

Award-winning author Bonnie Rough never expected to write a book about sex, but life handed her a revelation too vital to ignore. As an American parent grappling with concerns about raising children in a society steeped in stereotypes and sexual shame, she couldn't quite picture how to teach the facts of life with a fearless, easygoing, positive attitude. Then a job change relocated her family to Amsterdam, where she soon witnessed the relaxed and egalitarian sexual attitudes of the Dutch. There, she discovered, children learn from babyhood that bodies are normal, the world's best sex ed begins in kindergarten, cooties are a foreign concept, puberty is no big surprise, and questions about sex are welcome at the dinner table.

In Beyond Birds and Bees, Rough reveals how although normalizing human sexuality may sound risky, doing so actually prevents unintended consequences, leads to better health and success for our children, and lays the foundation for a future of gender equality. Exploring how the Dutch example translates to American life, Rough highlights a growing wave of ambitious American parents, educators, and influencers poised to transform sex ed and our society for the better, and shows how families everywhere can give a modern lift to the birds and bees.

Down to earth and up to the minute with our profound new cultural conversations about gender, sex, power, autonomy, diversity, and consent, Rough's careful research and engaging storytelling illuminate a forward path for a groundbreaking generation of Americans who want clear examples and actionable steps for how to support children's sexual development, and overall wellbeing from birth onward at home, in schools, and across our evolving culture.


Beyond Intelligence: Secrets for Raising Happily Productive Kids. Dona Matthews & Joanne Foster, $19.95

What is intelligence? Is it really a have or have not proposition, as we’ve been led to believe? Are some children just destined to fall behind? Dona Matthews and Joanne Foster answer those questions with a resounding “No!” In Beyond Intelligence, they demonstrate that every child has the ability to succeed — with the right support and guidance. But how can parents provide that support? Matthews and Foster proceed from the assumption that knowledge is power, offering parents an information-packed guide to identifying a child’s ability, fostering creativity, and bolstering effort and persistence.

Using case studies and anecdotes from their personal and professional experience, they explore different ways of learning; the links between creativity and intelligence; and how to best to provide emotional and social supports. They offer critical advice on how to work co-operatively with schools and educators, and address how to embrace failures as learning opportunities. Drawing on the latest research in brain development and education theory, Beyond Intelligence is a must-read for today’s parents and educators.

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Born Reading: Bringing Up Bookworms in a Digital Age from Picture Books to eBooks and Everything In Between. Jason Boog, $18.99

Every parent wants to give his or her child a competitive advantage. In Born Reading, publishing insider (and new dad) Jason Boog explains how that can be as simple as opening a book. Studies have shown that interactive reading — a method that creates dialogue as you read together — can raise a child’s IQ, and can have just as much of a determining factor on a child’s IQ as vitamins and a healthy diet. Born Reading offers a program for parents and professionals on how to raise kids who love to read, featuring:

  • interviews with childhood development experts
  • reading recommendations for kids from birth up to age five
  • the top apps endorsed by teachers, librarians, parents

Boosting Brain Power: 52 Ways to Use What Science Tells Us. Jill Stamm, $18.95

If the timing is right, the learning that occurs in the first five years can be a gold mine, promoting valuable cognitive and physical development that lasts a lifetime. Boosting Brain Power provides 52 strategies — one for every week of the year — to help stimulate healthy brain growth in young children. In addition to well-researched strategies, each snippet of information offers evidence-based instructions for how to bring the concepts to life.


BOYS: What it Takes To Become a Man. Rachel Giese, $32.99

The successes of feminism have led to greater opportunities for girls, by challenging stifling stereotypes about femininity and broadening the understanding of what it means to be female. While boys have travelled alongside this transformation, narrow definitions of masculinity and manliness haven’t faced the same degree of scrutiny. Whether they’re being urged to “man up” or warned that “boys don’t cry,” young men are subjected to damaging messages about manliness: they must muzzle their emotions and never show weakness, dominate girls and compete with one another.

Boys: What It Means to Become a Man examines how these toxic rules can hinder boys’ emotional and social development. If girls can expand the borders of femaleness, could boys also be set free of limiting, damaging expectations about manhood and masculinity? Could what’s been labelled “the boy crisis” be the beginning of a revolution in how we raise young men?

Drawing on extensive research and interviews with educators, activists, parents, psychologists, sociologists, and young men, Giese — mother to a son herself — examines the myths of masculinity and the challenges facing boys today. She reports from boys-only sex education classes and recreational sports leagues; talks to parents of transgender children and plays video games with her son. She tells stories of boys navigating the transition into manhood and how the upheaval in cultural norms about sex, sexuality and the myths of masculinity have changed the coming of age process for today’s boys. With lively reportage and clear-eyed analysis, Giese reveals that the movement for gender equality has the potential to liberate us all.

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Brain-Based Parenting: the Neuroscience of Caregiving for Healthy Attachment. Daniel Hughes & Jonathan Baylin, $38.95

In this groundbreaking exploration of the brain mechanisms behind healthy caregiving, attachment specialist Daniel Hughes and veteran clinical psychologist Jonathan Baylin guide readers through the intricate web of neuronal processes, hormones, and chemicals that drive — and sometimes thwart — our caregiving impulses, uncovering the mysteries of the parental brain. 

The biggest challenge to parents, Hughes and Baylin explain, is learning how to regulate emotions that arise — feeling them deeply and honestly while staying grounded and aware enough to preserve the parent–child relationship. Learning to be a "good parent" is contingent upon learning how to manage stress, understand its brain-based cues, and respond in a way that will set the brain back on track. With this awareness, we learn how to approach kids with renewed playfulness, acceptance, curiosity, and empathy, re-regulate our caregiving systems, foster deeper social engagement, and facilitate our children's development.

Infused with clinical insight, illuminating case examples, and helpful illustrations, Brain-Based Parenting brings the science of caregiving to light for the first time. Far from just managing our children's behavior, we can develop our "parenting brains," and with a better understanding of the neurobiological roots of our feelings and our own attachment histories, we can transform a fraught parent-child relationship into an open, regulated, and loving one.


Brainstorm: the Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain. Daniel Siegel, $21.95

Between the ages of 12 and 24, the brain changes in important, and oftentimes maddening, ways. It’s no wonder that many parents approach their child’s adolescence with fear and trepidation. According to renowned neuropsychiatrist Daniel Siegel, however, if parents and teens can work together to form a deeper understanding of the brain science behind all the tumult, they will be able to turn conflict into connection and form a deeper understanding of one another.    

In Brainstorm, Siegel illuminates how brain development impacts teenagers’ behavior and relationships. Drawing on important new research in the field of interpersonal neurobiology, he explores exciting ways in which understanding how the teenage brain functions can help parents make what is in fact an incredibly positive period of growth, change, and experimentation in their children’s lives less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.


Chasing Rainbows: Exploring Gender Fluid Parenting Practices. Edited by Fiona Joy Green & May Friedman, $24.95

Feminist parenting creates unique challenges. For parents attempting to resist the binaries of mothering and fathering, this book casts a lens on the messy and convoluted ways that feminist parents approach parenting in gender aware and gender fluid ways.

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A Child’s Brain: Understanding How the Brain Works, Develops, and Changes During Critical Stages of Childhood. Robert Sylwester, $25.95

A Child's Brain is a guide understanding children’s cognitive development, and how to nurture children to their full potential. The book examines the neurobiology of childhood, explaining the body and brain systems that develop during pregnancy, infancy, and childhood. It explores factors that can enhance or delay development, such as nutrition, family life, relationships, illness, intelligence, technology, creativity, and the arts. The book also provides practical suggestions to help adults promote healthy development and successful learning in the children they encounter at home, at school, and everywhere else. A Child's Brain helps parents and educators understand the biological, emotional, and neurological changes that occur during childhood so they can support children’s learning, socialization, and growth.


Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children. Joel Bakan, $24.00 

Childhood Under Siege reveals big business's discovery of a new resource to be mined for profit — our children. It’s a winner-takes-all battle for children’s hearts, minds and bodies as corporations pump billions into rendering parents and governments powerless to protect children from their calculated commercial assault and its disturbing toll on their health and well-being. Childhood Under Siege is a shocking venture behind the scenes of the widespread manipulation of children by profit-seeking corporations—and of society’s failure to protect them.


Children at Their Best: Understanding and Using the Five Elements to Develop Children's Full Potential for Parents, Teachers, and Therapists. Karin Kalbantner-Wernicke & Bettye Jo Wray-Fears, $29.95

Understanding child development through the prism of the Five Elements adds an exciting new dimension to western thinking on the nurture of children. It can not only explain patterns of behaviour in a new and helpful way, but suggest approaches and methods to help children, and groups of children, become more balanced and therefore happier, more resilient, and more open to learning and new experience. The authors explain in detail the characteristics of each of the Five Elements of Chinese thought (Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water) with their distinctive modes of expression and potential associated difficulties, and describe the problems that can occur if a child's elements are not in balance. In doing so, they provide a completely new and accessible way of understanding the emotional and behavioural state, and developmental stage of a child, in and out of the classroom. They introduce a wide range of easy-to-do and entertaining exercises and group activities to balance the elements, both individually and in groups.

This exciting and practical book will help anyone working with or caring for children to deepen their understanding of childhood behaviour in general, and of individual children in particular, and to take active steps to nurture their potential, including teachers, therapists, occupational therapists, Chinese medicine and other alternative medicine practitioners, and Qigong and martial arts teachers, as well as parents.

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The Collapse of Parenting: How We Hurt Our Kids When We Treat Them Like Grown-Ups. Leonard Sax, $22.49

In The Collapse of Parenting, internationally acclaimed author Leonard Sax argues that rising levels of obesity, depression, and anxiety among young people can be traced to parents abdicating their authority. The result is children who have no standard of right and wrong, who lack discipline, and who look to their peers and the Internet for direction. Sax shows how parents must reassert their authority by limiting time with screens, by encouraging better habits at the dinner table, and by teaching humility and perspective to help their children thrive in an increasingly complicated world.


A Complete Guide for Single Dads. Craig Baird, $24.95

A Complete Guide for Single Moms. Janis Adams, $24.95

Regardless of how you became a single parent, these books are designed to help you raise a happy, healthy child on your own. From infancy through adolescence, there is a wealth of information here to cover every aspect of parenting.


Connected Parenting: How to Raise a Great Kid. Jennifer Kolari, $21.00

Connected Parenting offers a unique form of therapeutic parenting based on Kolari's groundbreaking application of the concept of "mirroring," an instinctive process that helps parents bond with their children and promotes optimum growth and development. Kolari's strategy is highly effective for kids of all ages, and has been proven to reduce a child's anxiety, increase self-esteem, and allow children to become more resilient and flexible. With step-by-step advice and examples from Kolari's years of experience, this is an easy-to-follow guide to strengthening the bond between you and your children.


The Conscious Parent. Shefali Tsabary, $29.50

Turning the traditional notion of parenting on its head, Dr. Tsabary shifts the parent-child relationship away from the traditional parent-to-child “teaching” approach to a parent-with-child relationship that is mindful, conscious and mutually supportive.

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The Dad Factor: How Father-Baby Bonding Helps a Child for Life. Richard Fletcher, $27.95

This stimulating book explores many fascinating new understandings of the importance of a father in a child’s development. Richard Fletcher, a pioneer researcher in the area of men’s health and family issues, examines how a father’s close bond with his baby is vital for the development of the child’s healthy brain structure and their cognitive and emotional development.

The Dad Factor presents explanations of why a father’s involvement with his child, right from birth, is vitally important to the development of a child’s brain and emotional stability. Additionally, Richard Fletcher addresses some contentious issues of child development, examines the evolution of a father’s role, and uses feedback from men in his parenting classes to answer many questions a new father-to-be might have.


Dad to Dad: Parenting Like a Pro. David Hill, $16.95

All fathers have heard it before — having a baby really changes your life. Dr. David is a dad and a pediatrician. Inside this practical book, dads and dads-to-be will find helpful information on topics such as:

  • Infant and child development
  • Baby basics — crying, sleeping, pooping, and eating
  • Everyday illnesses and what to look for — fevers, ear infections, colds, stomach bugs, and sore throats
  • A guide to vaccines, when to get them, and just what they're for
  • Sound advice to cope with toddlerhood and beyond

Daddy Doin' Work: Empowering Mothers to Evolve Fatherhood. Doyin Richards, $20.99

Doyin Richards answers questions about fatherhood that many women want to know in his no-nonsense, entertaining style. He urges new mothers to enter the minds of new dads, thereby changing their perception of what should be expected from a modern father. Richards exposes the manipulative secrets of deadbeat dads, offers practical tips to help hardworking dads understand that being a father encompasses more than paying the bills, and provides methods to ensure that amazing dads stay on track, while inspiring more fathers to be just like them. The conversation also asks mothers to take a long look in the mirror to determine if they are part of the solution — or part of the problem — in shaping the behavior of modern fathers.

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The Danish Way of Parenting: What the Happiest People in the World Know about Raising Confident, Capable Kids. Jessica Joelle Alexander & Iben Dissing Sandahl, $22.00

What makes Denmark the happiest country in the world, and how do Danish parents raise happy, confident, successful kids, year after year? This upbeat and practical guide reveals the habits of the happiest families on earth. With illuminating examples and simple yet powerful advice, the authors present six essential principles, which spell out P-A-R-E-N-T:

  • Play is essential for development and well-being.
  • Authenticity fosters trust and an "inner compass."
  • Reframing helps kids cope with setbacks and look on the bright side.
  • Empathy allows us to act with kindness towards others.
  • No ultimatums means no power struggles, lines in the sand, or resentment.
  • Togetherness is a way to celebrate family time, on special occasions and every day. The Danes call this hygge — and it's a simple yet meaningful way to foster a close bond.

A revealing and fresh take on cross-cultural parenting advice, The Danish Way of Parenting will help parents from all walks of life raise the happiest, most well-adjusted kids in the world.


Digital Kids: How to Balance Screen Time, and Why it Matters. Martin Kutscher, $19.95

For many children and teens daily Internet use is the norm — but where should we draw the line when it comes to digital media usage? This handy book lays out the essential information needed to understand and prevent excessive Internet use that negatively impacts behaviour, education, family life, and even physical health.

Martin Kutscher, MD analyses neurological, psychological and educational research and draws on his own experience to show when Internet use stops being a good thing and starts to become excessive. He shows how to spot digital addictions, and offers whole family approaches for limiting the harmful effects of too much screen time, such as helping kids to learn to control their own Internet use. He tackles diverse questions ranging from the effects of laptops in the classroom and reading on a digital screen, to whether violent videogames lead to aggression. The author also explains how ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can make you more susceptible to Internet addiction, suggesting practical strategies to suit these specific needs. Discussing both the good and bad aspects of the internet, this book tells you everything you need to know to help children and young people use the internet in a healthy, balanced way.

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Do Men Mother? Fathering, Care and Domestic Responsibility, 2nd Edition. Andrea Doucet, $42.95

The second edition of Andrea Doucet’s Do Men Mother? builds upon the award winning first edition to further illuminate fathers' candid reflections on caring and the intricate social worlds that men and women inhabit as they ‘love and let go’ of their children. Including interviews with over one hundred fathers — from truck drivers to insurance salesmen, physicians to artists — Doucet illustrates how men are breaking the mould of traditional parenting models. 

This edition expands her argument wider and deeper, building on changes to the theoretical work that informs the field, her own intellectual trajectory, and the fieldwork of revisiting six fathers and their partners a decade after her initial interviews. She continues to examine key questions such as: What leads fathers to trade earning for caring?  How do fathers navigate through the 'maternal worlds' of mothers and infants? Are men mothering or are they redefining fatherhood? In asking and unravelling the question ‘Do men mother?’ this study  tells a compelling story about Canadian parents radically re-envisioning child care and domestic responsibilities in the twenty-first century.


Do Parents Matter? Why Japanese Babies Sleep Soundly, Mexican Siblings Don't Fight, and American Families Should Just Relax. Robert LeVine & Sarah LeVine, $33.99

American parents drive themselves crazy trying to raise perfect children. There is always another news article or scientific finding proclaiming the importance of some factor or other, but it's easy to miss the bigger picture: that parents can only affect their children so much.

In their decades-long study of global parenting styles, Harvard anthropologists (and grandparents themselves) Robert LeVine and Sarah LeVine reveal how culture may affect children more than parents do. Japanese children co-sleep with their parents well into grade school, while women of the Hausa tribe avoid verbal and eye contact with their infants, and yet, they are as likely as any of us to raise happy, well-adjusted children. The LeVines' fascinating global survey suggests we embrace our limitations as parents, instead of exhausting ourselves by constantly trying to fix them. Do Parents Matter? is likely the deepest and broadest survey of its kind, with profound lessons for the way we think about our families.


The Earthbound Parent: How (and Why) to Raise Your Little Angels Without Religion. Richard Conn, $19.95

Richard Conn demonstrates why all parents who value science and reason can help stop the centuries-old practice of religious indoctrination and offers advice on how to encourage children to discover the world and their place in it for themselves. Only by teaching them that we are in this world together and have a limited time to live can we truly enable them to flourish and build a peaceful world — not just for their generation but for the future.

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Everyday Kitchen for Kids: 100 Amazing Savory and Sweet Recipes Children Can Really Make. Jennifer Low, $29.95

What's the best way to get kids excited about trying new foods? By getting them into the kitchen to make new dishes all by themselves! No sharp knives. No stove-top cooking. No motorized appliances. All good tasting, and all fun.


Experimenting with Babies: 50 Amazing Science Projects You Can Perform on Your Kid. Shaun Gallagher, $22.00

This fascinating and hands-on guide shows you how to recreate landmark scientific studies on cognitive, motor, language, and behavioral development — using your own bundle of joy as the research subject. Simple, engaging, and fun for both baby and parents, each project sheds light on how your child is acquiring new skills — everything from recognizing faces, voices, and shapes to understanding new words, learning to walk, and even distinguishing between right and wrong. Whether your little research subject is a newborn, a few months old, or a toddler, these simple, surprising projects will help you see the world through your baby’s eyes.


Fantastic First Time Father: 50 Things You Really Need to Know. Tim Mungeam, $24.99

Crucial information and advice that will help you every step of the way — from finding out you are going to be a parent, to your responsibilities as a role model and a caregiver.

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Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity. Andrew Solomon, $25.00

Solomon’s startling proposition is that diversity is what unites us all. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the triumphs of love Solomon documents in every chapter.

Drawing on forty thousand pages of interview transcripts with more than three hundred families, Solomon mines the eloquence of ordinary people facing extreme challenges. Woven into their courageous and affirming stories is Solomon’s journey to accepting his own identity, which culminated in his midlife decision, influenced by this research, to become a parent.

Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original thinker, Far From the Tree explores themes of generosity, acceptance, and tolerance — all rooted in the insight that love can transcend every prejudice. This crucial and revelatory book expands our definition of what it is to be human.


The Feminist's Guide to Raising a Little Princess: How to Raise a Girl Who's Authentic, Joyful, and Fearless — Even If She Refuses to Wear Anything But a Pink Tutu. Devorah Blachor, $22.00

“May God grant me the serenity to accept the color pink, the courage to not let my house become a shrine to pink and princesses, and the wisdom to know that pink is just a color, not a decision to never attend college in the hopes of marrying wealthy.”  - from The Feminist’s Guide to Raising a Little Princess

Devorah Blachor, an ardent feminist, never expected to be the parent of a little girl who was totally obsessed with the color pink, princesses, and all things girly. When her three-year-old daughter fell down the Disney Princess rabbit hole, she wasn’t sure how to reconcile the difference between her parental expectations and the reality of her daughter’s passion.

In this book inspired by her viral New York Times Motherlode piece “Turn Your Princess-Obsessed Toddler Into a Feminist in Eight Easy Steps,” Blachor offers insight, advice, and plenty of humor and personal anecdotes for other mothers who cringe each morning when their daughter refuses to wear anything that isn’t pink. Her story of how she surrendered control and opened up — to her Princess Toddler, to pink, and to life — is a universal tale of modern parenting. She addresses important issues such as how to raise a daughter in a society that pressures girls and women to bury their own needs, conform to a beauty standard and sacrifice their own passions. Smart, funny, and thought-provoking, this book shows feminist parents how to navigate their daughters’ princess-obsessed years by taking a non-judgmental and positive approach.


52 Questions for Families: Learn More about Your Family — One Question At a Time. Travis Hellstrom, $7.50

Talking with your family is essential to creating lasting bonds and great memories, and it has never been easier than with 52 Questions for Families, which includes a year’s worth of fun, thought-provoking conversation starters to help you learn more about your loved ones. Whether you want to get to know your children better, find out what the past was like from Grandma, or just want to spend a family night in, 52 Questions for Families can ask all of the questions for you.

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Foster Parenting Step-by-Step: How to Nurture the Traumatized Child and Overcome Conflict. Kalyani Gopal, $17.95

When you decide to foster, you are faced with many difficult decisions, dilemmas and questions: How do you navigate the daily struggles of foster parenting? How can you nurture bonds with your foster child who is angry, sad, and defiant? How can you prepare to step back when it's time to let go?

FOSTER PARENTING STEP-BY-STEP is a concise how-to guide to fostering that summarizes what to expect as a foster parent, and gives immediate practical solutions. It outlines the different stages of a fostering relationship, raising common issues encountered at each age and how to tackle them. It also explains the impact of trauma on your child: how this can show itself through challenging behavior and how to respond to it. This book will provide fostering parents with the skills and knowledge to support the needs of the children in foster care. It will be invaluable not just to foster parents but also to those professionals supporting foster placements.


Game On! Screen-Free Fun for Children Two and Up. Linda Armstrong, $27.95

It appears the days of fun and games for children have been replaced with apps and screen time. Electronic games promote individual play and connect us to screens, not people. Game On! is a collection of 300+ screen-free, traditional games and activities for children and adults that require minimal materials other than people and their brains to play. All games and activities are adaptable according to the players age, their interests, and their abilities. Unplug from screened, individual play and connect with Game On!


The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us about the Relationship Between Parents and Children. Alison Gopnik, $23.50

Caring deeply about our children is part of what makes us human. Yet the thing we call "parenting" is a surprisingly new invention. In the past thirty years, the concept of parenting and the multibillion dollar industry surrounding it have transformed child care into obsessive, controlling, and goal-oriented labor intended to create a particular kind of child and therefore a particular kind of adult. In The Gardener and the Carpenter, the pioneering developmental psychologist and philosopher Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st-century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong — it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Drawing on the study of human evolution and her own cutting-edge scientific research into how children learn, Gopnik shows that although caring for children is profoundly important, it is not a matter of shaping them to turn out a particular way. Children are designed to be messy and unpredictable, playful and imaginative, and to be very different both from their parents and from each other. The variability and flexibility of childhood lets them innovate, create, and survive in an unpredictable world. “Parenting" won't make children learn — but caring parents let children learn by creating a secure, loving environment.

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Geek Parenting: What Joffrey, Jor-El, Maleficent, and the McFlys Teach Us about Raising a Family. Stephen Segal, $16.95

It takes a starship to raise a child. Or a time machine. Or a tribe of elves. Fortunately, Geek Parenting offers all that and more, with thoughtful mini-essays that reveal profound child-rearing advice (and mistakes) from the most beloved tales of geek culture. Nerds and norms alike can take counsel from some of the most iconic parent–child pairings found in pop culture: Aunt May and Peter Parker, Benjamin and Jake Sisko, Elrond and Arwen, even Cersei and Joffrey. Whether you’re raising an Amazon princess, a Jedi Padawan, a brooding vampire, or a standard-issue human child, Geek Parenting helps you navigate the ion storms, alternate realities, and endless fetch quests that come with being a parent.


The Gender Agenda: a First-Hand Account of How Girls and Boys Are Treated Differently. Ros Ball & James Millar, $19.95

From language and clothes, to toys and the media, society inflicts unwritten rules on each gender from birth. Aiming to make people aware of the way gender is constructed and constantly reinforced, this diary chronicles the differences two parents noticed while raising their son and daughter.

Adapted from tweets and blogs the couple kept throughout parenthood, this collection shows how culture, family and even the authors themselves are part of the 'gender police' that can influence a child's identity, and offers ideas for how we can work together to challenge the gender stereotypes that are ingrained in our society.


Gender Born, Gender Made: Raising Healthy Gender-Nonconforming Children. Diane Ehrensaft, $25.95

GENDER BORN, GENDER MADE is a comprehensive guidebook for the parents and therapists of children who do not identify with or behave according to their biological gender. Drawing on the case histories of several children, each "gender creative" in his or her own way, Dr. Diane Ehrensaft offers concrete strategies for understanding and supporting children who experience confusion about their gender identities. She also discusses the latest therapeutic advancements available to gender-variant children.

Traditionally, psychologists have sought to "cure" gender variance by pressuring children to conform to typical gender behavior. From her perspective as both clinician and parent of a gender creative child, Dr. Ehrensaft advocates a new approach, encouraging caregivers to support gender-variant children as they explore their gender identities. Rather than offering a "cure" for gender variance, GENDER BORN, GENDER MADE facilitates improved understanding and communication about gender identity.

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The Gender Creative Child: Pathways for Nurturing and Supporting Children Who Love Outside Gender Boxes. Diane Ehrensaft, $23.95

In her groundbreaking first book, Gender Born, Gender Made, Dr. Diane Ehrensaft coined the term gender creative to describe children whose unique gender expression or sense of identity is not defined by a checkbox on their birth certificate. Now, with The Gender Creative Child, she returns to guide parents and professionals through the rapidly changing cultural, medical, and legal landscape of gender and identity.

In this up-to-date, comprehensive resource, Dr. Ehrensaft explains the interconnected effects of biology, nurture, and culture to explore why gender can be fluid, rather than binary. As an advocate for the gender affirmative model and with the expertise she has gained over three decades of pioneering work with children and families, she encourages caregivers to listen to each child, learn their particular needs, and support their quest for a true gender self. The Gender Creative Child unlocks the door to a gender-expansive world, revealing pathways for positive change in our schools, our communities, and the world.


Gentle Discipline: Using Emotional Connection Not Punishment to Raise Confident, Capable Kids. Sarah Ockwell-Smith, $22.00

Discipline is an essential part of raising happy and successful kids, but as more and more parents are discovering, conventional approaches often don’t work, and can even lead to more frustration, resentment, power struggles, and shame. Enter Sarah Ockwell-Smith, a popular parenting expert who believes there’s a better way. Citing the latest research in child development, psychology and neuroscience, Gentle Discipline debunks common myths about punishments, rewards, the “naughty chair,” and more, and presents practical, connection-based techniques that really work–and that bring parents and kids closer together instead of driving then apart. Topics include:

  • Setting — and enforcing — boundaries and limits with compassion and respect
  • Focusing on connection and positivity instead of negative consequences
  • Working with teachers and other caregivers
  • Breaking the cycle of shaming and blaming

Filled with ideas to try today, Gentle Discipline helps parents of toddlers as well  as school-age kids embrace a new, more enlightened way to help kids listen, learn and grow.

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Getting to Calm: the Early Years. Laura Kastner, $26.95

Getting to Calm: The Early Years is the first book for parents of children ages 3–7 that analyzes popular parenting approaches in light of fifty years of parenting research and current evidence-based treatment models. Offering clear, step-by-step descriptions of proven and effective techniques, this book guides parents as they help their children build competencies while coping with some of the most common and painful problems of the early years, including:

  • Sleepless nights
  • Clinginess
  • Tantrums
  • Whining
  • Power struggles
  • Lying
  • Defiance

Through vivid family vignettes, Kastner illustrates the common traps and travails of parenting young kids, showing us what has been proven to work (and what certainly has not), with an emphasis on positive parenting and wise-minded decision making. This accessible, insightful, and ultimately enjoyable book offers tremendous support, powerful skills, and plentiful encouragement for anyone who is parenting a child through the early years.


The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed. Jessica Lahey, $19.99

Modern parenting is defined by an unprecedented level of overprotectiveness — parents now rush to school to deliver forgotten assignments, challenge teachers on report card disappointments, mastermind children's friendships, and interfere on the playing field. As teacher, journalist, and parent Jessica Lahey explains, even though these parents see themselves as being highly responsive to their children's well-being, they aren't giving them the chance to experience failure — or the opportunity to learn to solve their own problems.

Everywhere she turned, Lahey saw an obvious and startling fear of failure, in both her students and in her own children. This fear has the potential to undermine children's autonomy, competence, motivation, and their relationships with the adults in their lives. Providing a clear path toward solutions, Lahey lays out a blueprint with targeted advice for handling homework, report cards, social dynamics, and sports. Most important, she sets forth a plan to help parents learn to step back and embrace their children's setbacks along with their successes.

Empathetic and wise, The Gift of Failure is essential reading for parents, educators, and psychologists nationwide who want to help children thrive — and grow into independent, confident adults.

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Good Dog, Happy Baby: Preparing Your Dog for the Arrival of Your Child. Michael Wombacher, $27.95

For years dog trainer Michael Wombacher has worked with expecting dog owners to prevent problems between dogs and children. He has also unfortunately witnessed too many families forced to surrender their beloved family companions because they failed to prepare the dog for the arrival of a new family member. In Good Dog, Happy Baby, Wombacher lays out a twelve-step process that will give families the skills they need to navigate this new era of their lives. These skills include how to evaluate dogs, resolve common behavior problems, and fully prepare dogs for a new baby. This easy-to-use guide, filled with photos and simple instructions, makes a great gift for any expecting family with a dog, whether the dog is perfectly trained or in serious need of behavioral help.


Grandparents as Parents: a Survival Guide for Raising a Second Family. Sylvie de Toledo & Deborah Edler Brown, $24.95

If you're among the millions of grandparents raising grandchildren today, you need information, support, and practical guidance you can count on to keep your family strong. This is the book for you. Learn effective strategies to help you cope with the stresses of parenting the second time around, care for vulnerable grandkids and set boundaries with their often-troubled parents, and navigate the maze of government aid, court proceedings, and special education. Wise, honest, moving stories show how numerous other grandparents are surviving and thriving in their new roles. Updated throughout, and reflecting current laws and policies affecting families, the second edition features new discussions of kids' technology use and other timely issues.


Growing Strong Girls: Practical Tools to Cultivate Connection in the Preteen Years. Lindsay Sealey, $22.99

Girls today face an astounding degree of pressure to grow up fast, to be “perfect” in every way, and to be all things to all people. They yearn to connect, but sometimes this yearning turns into negative, even destructive patterns such as passive aggressiveness, gossip, or excessive stress and anxiety. It’s heart-breaking to watch even the most confident little girls disconnect and lose their spark — and their way — when they hit the 9–14 years.

In Growing Strong Girls, educator and girl expert and advocate Lindsay Sealey reveals the tremendous power of connection to activate self-awareness, self-acceptance, and healthy social and emotional development. This wide-ranging and positive book is chock-full of ideas, tips, activities, stories and specific ways to connect with and equip girls to know and trust themselves, to create vibrant friendships and communities, and to step into their tween and teen years with resilience, bravery, confidence, and inner strength. Growing Strong Girls offers hundreds of practical ways to cultivate connection right now. Making a difference in the lives of girls is easier than you might think and powerful beyond measure.

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Holding Tight, Letting Go: Raising Healthy Kids in Anxious Times. Benjamin Garber, $24.95

When to hold on; when to let go — a constant dilemma of parenthood. This timely book examines the balance between these powerful dynamics. How parents can instill confidence and security in children and how professionals can recognize and respond when this process goes awry. Holding too long and too tight? Letting go too soon and too easily? Includes down-to-earth descriptions of family systems and identity development and guidance on remaining an emotional anchor in children's lives as they launch toward independence.


The Homegrown Preschooler: Teaching Your Kids in the Places They Live. Kathy Lee & Lesli Richards, $39.95

Find exciting learning opportunities in everyday occurrences, from using laundry to teach sorting to exploring growth cycles in the garden, with the easy-to-organize, simple-to-start ideas, advice, and activities in THE HOMEGROWN PRESCHOOLER. As straightforward as a parenting how-to book and as easily applicable as a set curriculum, THE HOMEGROWN PRESCHOOLER will inspire parents to use their homes as classrooms and take advantage of the naturally rich learning opportunities existing in everyday life.

With organizational tips, recipes, and more than 200 easy-to-pull-together activities, homeschool educators will have everything they need to offer a well-rounded preschool education rivaling the best classroom experience. Convenient charts and checklists to document children’s growth ensure that there are no gaps in educational, social, or physical development.


Honey, I Wrecked the Kids: When Yelling, Screaming, Threats, Bribes, Time-Outs, Sticker Charts and Removing Privileges All Don't Work. Alyson Schafer, $17.99

For those who've tried just about everything to discipline their kids, HONEY, I WRECKED THE KIDS explains why children today are resistant to traditional parenting methods and how only a new model for winning cooperation really works. Full of real-life examples, the book gives parents a deeper understanding of misbehaviour and their role in it, shies away from traditional behavioural models of parenting, and offers humane, good-humoured advice that will make parenting a manageable and, finally, rewarding task.

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How to Raise Kind Kids: and Get Respect, Gratitude, and a Happier Family In the Bargain. Thomas Lickona, $23.00

Can you teach a child to be kind?

This vital question is taking on a new urgency as our culture grows ever more abrasive and divided.

We all want our kids to be kind. But that is not the same as knowing what to do when you catch your son being unkind.  A world-renowned developmental psychologist, Dr. Thomas Lickona has led the character education movement in schools for forty years. Now he shares with parents the vital tools they need to bring peace and foster cooperation at home. Kindness doesn’t stand on its own. It needs a supporting cast of other essential virtues — like courage, self-control, respect, and gratitude.

With concrete examples drawn from the many families Dr. Lickona has worked with over the years and clear tips you can act on tonight, How to Raise Kind Kids will help you give and get respect, hold family meetings to tackle persistent problems, discipline in a way that builds character, and improve the dynamic of your relationship with your children while putting them on the path to a happier and more fulfilling life.


How to Raise a Wild Child: the Art and Science of Falling in Love with Nature. Scott Sampson, $22.95

American children spend four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors — 90 percent less time than their parents did. Yet recent research indicates that experiences in nature are essential for healthy growth. Regular exposure to nature can help relieve stress, depression, and attention deficits. It can reduce bullying, combat illness, and boost academic scores. Most critical of all, abundant time in nature seems to yield long-term benefits in kids’ cognitive, emotional, and social development. Yet teachers, parents, and other caregivers lack a basic understanding of how to engender a meaningful, lasting connection between children and the natural world. 

How to Raise a Wild Child offers a timely and engaging antidote, showing how kids’ connection to nature changes as they mature. Distilling the latest research in multiple disciplines, Sampson reveals how adults can help kids fall in love with nature — enlisting technology as an ally, taking advantage of urban nature, and instilling a sense of place along the way.


I Wished for You: a Keepsake Adoption Journal. Carrie Kipp Howard, $22.50

Cherish every step. Remember every chapter. Love every moment. Celebrate your unique adoption story with this gently guided journal designed with adoptive parents in mind.

  • Open-ended and playful prompts — perfect for any age or experience
  • Lots of spots for notes, photographs, announcements, and other mementos
  • Beautiful, simple design to make your own

Every child, every family’s story is unique... and now every story can be told. This beautifully designed keepsake journal captures all of the emotions, history, hopes, dreams, and surprises that each adoption journey entails through guided prompts that encourage parents to enjoy and reflect on their own experience. Created specifically for adoptive parents, I Wished for You celebrates each unique adoption story, where every milestone is remembered, every moment is cherished, and every child is wished for.

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iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy — and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood. Jean Twenge, $25.00

With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today’s rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and later, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person — perhaps why they are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness.

But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. iGen is also growing up more slowly than previous generations: eighteen-year-olds look and act like fifteen-year-olds used to.

As this new group of young people grows into adulthood, we all need to understand them: Friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation — and the world.


The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Needs from Grownups. Erika Christakis, $23.00

To a four-year-old watching bulldozers at a construction site or chasing butterflies in flight, the world is awash with promise. Little children come into the world hardwired to learn in virtually any setting and about any matter. Yet in today’s preschool and kindergarten classrooms, learning has been reduced to scripted lessons and suspect metrics that too often undervalue a child’s intelligence while overtaxing the child’s growing brain. These mismatched expectations wreak havoc on the family: parents fear that if they choose the “wrong” program, their child won’t get into the “right” college. But Yale early childhood expert Erika Christakis says our fears are wildly misplaced. Our anxiety about preparing and safeguarding our children’s future seems to have reached a fever pitch at a time when, ironically, science gives us more certainty than ever before that young children are exceptionally strong thinkers. 

Christakis’s message is energizing and reassuring: young children are inherently powerful, and they (and their parents) will flourish when we learn new ways of restoring the vital early learning environment to one that is best suited to the littlest learners. This bold and pragmatic challenge to the conventional wisdom peels back the mystery of childhood, revealing a place that’s rich with possibility.

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The Informed Parent: a Science-Based Resource for Your Child's First Four Years. Tara Haelle & Emily Willingham, $27.00

The latest scientific research on pregnancy, home birth, toilet training, breastfeeding, sleep training, vaccines, and other key topics — to help parents make their own best-informed decisions.

In the era of questionable Internet “facts” and parental over-sharing, it’s more important than ever to find credible information on everything from prenatal vitamins to screen time. Credible scientific studies are out there — and they’re “bottom-lined” in this book. The ultimate resource for today’s science-minded generation, The Informed Parent was written for readers who prefer facts to “friendly advice,” and who prefer to make up their own minds, based on the latest findings as well as their own personal preferences. Science writers and parents themselves, authors Tara Haelle and Emily Willingham have sifted through thousands of research studies on dozens of essential topics, and distill them in this essential and engaging book.


Inventing Ourselves: the Secret Life of the Teenage Brain. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, $35.50

The brain creates every feeling, emotion, and desire we experience, and stores every one of our memories. And yet, until very recently, scientists believed our brains were fully developed from childhood on. Now, thanks to imaging technology that enables us to look inside the living human brain at all ages, we know that this isn't so. Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, one of the world's leading researchers into adolescent neurology, explains precisely what is going on in the complex and fascinating brains of teenagers — namely that the brain goes on developing and changing right through adolescence — with profound implications for the adults these young people will become.

Blakemore's discoveries have transformed our understanding of the teenage mind, with consequences for law, education policy and practice, and, most of all, parents.


iRules: What Every Tech-Healthy Family Needs to Know about Selfies, Sexting, Gaming, and Growing Up. Janell Burley Hofmann, $19.99

In iRules, Janell Burley Hofmann provides families with the tools they need to find a balance between technology and human interaction through a philosophy she calls Slow Tech Parenting. In the book, she educates parents about the online culture tweens and teens enter the minute they go online, exploring issues like cyberbullying, friend fail, and sexting, as well as helping parents create their own iRules contracts to fit their families’ needs. As funny and readable as it is prescriptive, iRules will help parents figure out when to unplug and how to stay in sync with the changing world of technology, while teaching their children self-respect, integrity, and responsibility.

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It's OK to Go Up the Slide: Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids. Heather Shumaker, $22.00

With her first book, It’s OK Not to Share, Heather Shumaker overturned all the conventional rules of parenting with her “renegade rules” for raising competent and compassionate kids. In It’s Ok To Go Up the Slide, Shumaker takes on new hot-button issues with renegade rules such as:

  • Recess Is A Right
  • It’s Ok Not To Kiss Grandma
  • Ban Homework in Elementary School
  • Safety Second
  • Don’t Force Participation

Shumaker also offers broader guidance on how parents can control their own fears and move from an overscheduled life to one of more free play. Parenting can too often be reduced to shuttling kids between enrichment classes, but Shumaker challenges parents to re-evaluate how they’re spending their precious family time. This book helps parents help their kids develop important life skills in an age-appropriate way. Most important, parents must model these skills, whether it’s technology use, confronting conflict, or coping emotionally with setbacks. Sometimes being a good parent means breaking all the rules.


The Journey of the Heroic Parent: Your Child's Struggle & the Road Home. Brad Reedy, $17.95

Every day parents face heartbreaking situations. Raising a child struggling with mental health issues, addictions, depression, suicidal thoughts, eating disorders or just the normal angst associated with growing up can be frightening and confusing. When all you’ve done is not enough, when your child seems lost and you feel inept and impotent, Dr. Reedy can help you take the necessary steps to find your child, not with cursory cures or snappy solutions, but rather by effecting positive change in your own behavior.

On your journey, you will confront, re-evaluate, and grow confident in your beliefs as a parent. You will learn how to lovingly and effectively communicate your intentions to your child. Reedy’s process will teach you how to find peace and security in your skills as a parent, and help you get comfortable exactly where you are. Even if you’ve made mistakes, even if you think you’ve failed, you still have the power to be a great parent. Healthy parenting leads to a healthy life for your whole family, and The Journey of the Heroic Parent will be your guide as you walk the path to hope.

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Keeping Your Child in Mind. Claudia Gold, $17.50

Overcoming defiance, tantrums and other everyday behavior problems by seeing the world through your child's eyes.


Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder. Richard Louv, $23.95

As children’s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attention deficit disorder. In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply — and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.


Let Them Eat Dirt: Saving Your Child from an Oversanitized World. B. Brett Finaly & Marie-Claire Arrieta, $19.95

Babies and young kids are being raised in surroundings that are increasingly cleaner, more hyper hygienic, and more disinfected than ever before. As a result, the beneficial bacteria in their bodies is being altered, promoting conditions and diseases such as obesity, diabetes, asthma, allergies, and autism. As Let Them Eat Dirt shows, there is much that parents can do about this, including breastfeeding if possible, getting a dog, and avoiding antibiotics unless necessary — and yes, it is OK to let kids get a bit dirty.


Let Your Kids Go Wild Outside: Creative Ways to Help Children Discover Nature and Enjoy the Great Outdoors. Fiona Bird, $29.95

In an era when the iPad is often more appealing than the park, it can be difficult to encourage kids to get off the couch and go outside. In this inspirational book, with ideas for children of all ages, foraging expert Fiona Bird shows the value of playing outside and discovering nature for children and families alike.

The outside adventure begins In the Woods, where children are encouraged to make a nature mobile, decorate pooh sticks, and make a wild kite. In Meadows and Hedgerows, ideas include designing a wild garland and making potpourri. Onward to Seashores, Rivers, and Ponds, where children can have fun with seaweed, from building a seawood oven to making seaweed bath parcels — and they can hone their survival skills by learning to make a beach net and collecting shellfish.

For those who don’t want to move far from home, there’s plenty to do in the Backyard Station, such as making a sundial, building a wormery, and attracting birds with a home-made bird table. Finally, in My Wild Kitchen, develop your child’s hunting and gathering skills with seasonal recipes made from natural ingredients, such as seaweed popcorn, bramble and poppyseed muffins, and snow-ice-cream.

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Let's Get Ready for Reading: a Guide to Help Kids Become Readers. Toronto Public Library, $9.95

From the earliest age, children respond to stimuli that prepare them to enjoy books and reading. This guide offers a multitude of suggestions for parents and caregivers to foster a love of reading from the time a baby is born.

Whether it’s listening to the rhythmic cadence of chants and nursery rhymes, looking at brightly colored pictures, or listening to stories, children learn to associate reading with the warm and happy experience of spending time with a parent, grandparent, or caregiver. Filled with rhymes, songs, and games, Let’s Get Ready for Reading provides tons of suggestions for engaging kids, from using different voices for the characters in a book to helping them recognize shapes in preparation for learning the alphabet. A look at developmental milestones helps parents adapt strategies to the age of the child, while dozens of recommended books take out the guesswork during the next visit to the library or bookstore.


Let’s Go Outside! Jennifer Ward, illustrated by Susie Ghahremani, $17.95

Let’s Go Outside offers a range of activities perfect for fun in the city, the country and everything in between. Get outside and run, jump, play, explore, dance, hike or camp with your pre-teen and engage your child in outdoor activities and projects that will get the whole family closer to nature.


Life Hacks for Parents: Practical Hints for Making Life with Kids Easier. Dan Marshall, $19.99

Life Hacks for Parents provides simple, easy-to-follow advice for tackling life’s everyday annoyances using materials and techniques that are either already on hand or easily attainable. Every tip is fully illustrated, making each easy to follow and master. Packaged in an appealing and portable size and designed with an easy-to-open spine and rounded-corners perfect for a back pocket, diaper bag, backpack, or purse, this indispensable guide offers dozens of inspired yet practical techniques for tackling the entire house, from kitchen to playroom to bedroom to bathroom, including:

  • Cleaning Hacks
  • Tidying Hacks
  • Out and About Hacks
  • First Aid Hacks
  • Safety Hacks
  • Food and Drink Hacks
  • Arts and Crafts Hacks
  • Early Days Hacks

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#lightwebdarkweb: Three Reasons to Reform Social Media Be4 It Re-Forms Us. Raffi Cavoukian, $21.95

#lightwebdarkweb makes the case for the critical need to reform social media, especially for young users. Its author, Raffi Cavoukian, the renowned singer, Raffi, is also a writer, systems thinker, and founder of the Centre For Child Honouring. He offers three reasons for social media reform: safety, intelligence, and sustainability. A response to the suicide of Vancouver teen Amanda Todd after years of online harassment, and dedicated to her, #lightwebdarkweb is a call for sanity in the digital age:

  • social media providers must make systemic changes for young users safety
  • parents need to regulate their kids’ screen time and social media use
  • society can optimize the benefits of the Internet only by reducing its shadow of social, ecological and health hazards.

#lightwebdarkweb highlights children’s developmental needs as a key missing consideration in the digital revolution. The result is a much-needed book for our times.


Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in Contemporary Society. Edited by Carries Bourassa, Elder Betty McKenna & Darlene Juschka, $29.95

Listening to the Beat of Our Drum: Indigenous Parenting in a Contemporary Society is a collection of stories, inspired by a wealth of experiences across space and time from a kokum, an auntie, two-spirit parents, a Metis mother, a Tlinglit/Anishnabe Métis mother and an allied feminist mother. This book is born out of the need to share experiences and story. Storytelling is one of the most powerful forms of passing on teachings and values that we have in our Indigenous communities. This book weaves personal stories to explore mothering practices and examines historical contexts and underpinnings that contribute to contemporary parenting practices. We share our stories with the hope that it will resonate with readers whether they are in the classroom or in the community. Like our contributors, we are from all walks of life, sharing diverse perspectives about mothering whether it be as a mother, auntie, kokum or other adopted role.

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Little Flower Yoga for Kids: a Yoga and Mindfulness Program to Help Your Child Improve Attention and Emotional Balance. Jennifer Cohen Harper, $27.95

Little Flower Yoga for Kids offers a fun and unique program combining yoga and mindfulness in an easy-to-read format. Written specifically for parents and kids, the book aims at teaching children to pay attention, increase focus, and balance their emotions — all while building physical strength and flexibility. Based on a growing body of evidence that yoga and mindfulness practices can help children develop focus and concentration, the simple yoga exercises in this book can easily be integrated into their child's daily routine, ultimately improving health, behavior, and even school achievement.

The book details the five main components of the program: connect, breath, move, focus, and relax. Drawing on these components, Harper shares practical activities that parents can use with their children both on a daily basis and as applied to particularly challenging issues. And while this book is targeted to parents, teachers may also find it extremely useful in helping students achieve better attention and focus.


The M Word: Conversations about Motherhood. Edited by Kerry Clare, $22.95

In this original and sometimes provocative collection of essays, Saleema Nawaz, Alison Pick, Nancy Jo Cullen, Carrie Snyder, and many others explore the boundaries of contemporary motherhood. There are the women who have had too many children or not enough. There are women for whom motherhood is a fork in the road, encountered with contradictory emotions. And there are those who have made the conscious choice not to have children and then find themselves defined by that decision.


MINDSETS for Parents: Strategies to Encourage Growth Mindsets in Kids. Mary Cay Ricci & Margaret Lee, $23.95

All parents want their children to be successful in school, sports, and extracurricular activities. But it's not just about giving your kids praise or setting them on the right direction. Research shows that success is often dependent on mindset. Hard work, perseverance, and effort are all hallmarks of a growth mindset. That's where Mindsets for Parents comes in. Designed to provide parents with a roadmap for developing a growth mindset home environment, this book's conversational style and real-world examples make the popular mindsets topic approachable and engaging. It includes tools for informally assessing the mindsets of both parent and child, easy-to-understand brain research, and suggested strategies and resources for use with children of any age. This book gives parents and guardians powerful knowledge and methods to help themselves and their children learn to embrace life's challenges with a growth mindset and an eye toward increasing their effort and success!

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MIXED: Portraits of Multicultural Kids. Kip Fulbeck, $27.95

This joyful collection reflects the voices and faces of mixed race children, and celebrates family, individuality and identity.


The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children. Suzanne Bouffard, $35.00

At the heart of this groundbreaking book are two urgent questions: What do our young children need in the earliest years of school, and how do we ensure that they all get it? Cutting-edge research has proven that early childhood education is crucial for all children to gain the academic and emotional skills they need to succeed later in life.  Children who attend quality pre-K programs have a host of positive outcomes including better language, literacy, problem-solving and math skills down the line, and they have a leg up on what appears to be the most essential skill to develop at age four:  strong self-control.   But even with this overwhelming evidence, early childhood education is at a crossroads in America.  We know that children can and do benefit, but we also know that too many of our littlest learners don’t get that chance — millions of parents can’t find spots for their children, or their preschoolers end up in poor quality programs.

With engrossing storytelling, journalist Suzanne Bouffard takes us inside some of the country’s best pre-K classrooms to reveal the sometimes surprising ingredients that make them work — and to understand why some programs are doing the opposite of what is best for children. It also chronicles the stories of families and teachers from many backgrounds as they struggle to give their children a good start in school. This book is a call to arms when we are at a crucial moment, and perhaps on the verge of a missed opportunity: We now have the means and the will to have universal pre-kindergarten, but we are also in grave danger of not getting it right.


More 1-2-3 Magic

The Mother of All Parenting Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Raising a Happy, Healthy Child from Preschool through the Preteens. Ann Douglas, $24.99

Parenting is the toughest job on the planet. Fortunately, Canadian parents have Ann Douglas to turn to as their guide. Using her trademark non-bossy approach to all of the perennial parenting hot topics, Douglas has pulled together the latest research on everything from teaching kids self-discipline to preventing power struggles within the family to encouraging kids to feel great about themselves. The result is an all-Canadian guide to raising healthy, happy kids a book no Canadian parent should be without.

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The Mother of All Toddler Books: the All-Canadian Guide to Your Child's Second and Third Years. Ann Douglas, $19.99 http://www.parentbooks.ca/thumbs/tiny%20maple%20leaf.JPG

For over two decades, Canadians have counted on Ann Douglas for her reassuring, proven, and never-bossy advice. Featuring the latest recommendations from Canadian health authorities and the best tips from more than 100 Canadian parents, The Mother of All Toddler Books is an indispensable resource for helping you and your toddler thrive. Inside, you’ll find:

  • parenting strategies that nurture and grow your relationship with your toddler
  • parent-tested advice on coping with temper tantrums, biting, and other discipline challenges
  • key developmental milestones for the toddler years, with safety checklists to help you toddler-proof your home
  • the secret to serving up nutritious, toddler-pleasing meals plus understanding vitamin supplements, food allergies, and food intolerances
  • tried-and-true methods for making the transition from crib to bed easier, plus managing naps and other sleep difficulties
  • parent-to-parent dos and don’ts to make potty training simpler and less stressful
  • practical answers to managing fevers, ear infections, and other health questions that can have you hitting the panic button (and/or Google!) at 3 a.m.

Muddy Boots: Outdoor Activities for Children. Lisa Gardner Walsh, $21.95

No child can walk through a puddle of mud without a gigantic smile, and while the stuff might be the spring-time bane of grownups, children just love mud. Muddy Boots targets kids and families who value outdoor exploration and grandparents who long for their grandchildren to have the same unfettered time in nature as they did. The book features a wide range of hands-on activities for kids, including mud play, forts, animal tracking and forest wisdom, foraging, insects and worms, bird watching and bird feeding, and many small things for kids to make. Although not primarily about mud, the activities do encourage all hands to get dirty as they explore the world around them.

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No More Mean Girls: the Secret to Raising Strong, Confident, and Compassionate Girls. Katie Hurley, $23.00

Once upon a time, mean girls primarily existed in high school, while elementary school-aged girls spent hours at play and enjoyed friendships without much drama. But in this fast-paced world in which young girls are exposed to negative behaviors on TV and social media from the moment they enter school, they are also becoming caught up in social hierarchies much earlier. No More Mean Girls is a guide for parents to help their young daughters navigate tricky territories such as friendship building, creating an authentic self, standing up for themselves and others, and expressing themselves in a healthy way.

The need to be liked by others certainly isn't new, but this generation of girls is growing up in an age when the "like" button shows the world just how well-liked they are. When girls acknowledge that they possess positive traits that make them interesting, strong, and likeable, however, the focus shifts and their self-confidence soars; "likes" lose their importance. This book offers actionable steps to help parents empower young girls to be kind, confident leaders who work together and build each other up.


No-Drama Discipline: the Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. Daniel Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson, $23.00

The pioneering experts behind The Whole-Brain Child — Tina Payne Bryson and Daniel J. Siegel, the author of Brainstorm — now explore the ultimate child-raising challenge: discipline. Highlighting the fascinating link between a child’s neurological development and the way a parent reacts to misbehavior, No-Drama Discipline provides an effective, compassionate road map for dealing with tantrums, tensions, and tears — without causing a scene.

Defining the true meaning of the “d” word (to instruct, not to shout or reprimand), the authors explain how to reach your child, redirect emotions, and turn a meltdown into an opportunity for growth. By doing so, the cycle of negative behavior (and punishment) is essentially brought to a halt, as problem solving becomes a win/win situation.


No-Drama Discipline Workbook. Daniel Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson, $36.95

Exercises, activities, and practical strategies to calm the chaos and nurture developing minds.

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The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting is Bad for Your Kids and Dangerous for You Too! George Glass & David tabatsky, $38.95

Overparenting — anxious, invasive, overly attentive, and competitive parenting — may have finally backfired. As we witness the first generation of overparented children becoming adults in their own right, many studies show that when baby boomer parents intervene inappropriately — with too much advice, excessive favors, and erasing obstacles that kids should negotiate themselves — their “millennial” children end up ill-behaved, anxious, narcissistic, entitled youths unable to cope with everyday life. The obsession with providing everything a child could possibly need, from macrobiotic cupcakes to 24/7 tutors, has created epidemic levels of depression and stress in our country’s youth, but this can be avoided if parents would just take a giant step back, check their ambitions at the door, and do what’s really best for their kids.

Written by a noted psychiatrist and a parenting specialist, The Overparenting Epidemic is a science-based yet humorous and practical book that features an easy-to-read menu of pragmatic, reasonable advice for how to parent children effectively and lovingly without overdoing it, especially in the context of today’s demanding world.


Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. Brigid Schultz, $19.99

In OVERWHELMED, Schulte, a staff writer for The Washington Post, asks: Are our brains, our partners, our culture and our bosses making it impossible for us to experience anything but “contaminated time”?

How did researchers compile this statistic that said we were rolling in leisure — over four hours a day? Did any of us feel that we actually had downtime? Was there anything useful in their research — anything we could do?

OVERWHELMED is a map of the stresses that have ripped our leisure to shreds, and a look at how to put the pieces back together. Schulte speaks to neuroscientists, sociologists and hundreds of working parents to tease out the factors contributing to our collective sense of being overwhelmed, seeking insights, answers and inspiration. She investigates progressive offices that are trying to invent a new kind of workplace; she travels across Europe to get a sense of how other countries accommodate working parents; she finds younger couples who claim to have figured out an ideal division of chores, childcare and meaningful paid work. OVERWHELMED is the story of what she found out.


Parent Alert! How to Keep Your Kids Safe Online. Will Geddes, Nadia Sawalha & Kaye Adams, $21.99

Kids spend hours online, exploring the best the internet has to offer — but what about the risks? Who are they talking to on social media? How do you educate them about their digital footprint and protect them from trolls, bullies, frenemies, and stalkers? They may be tech-savvy, but they are not worldly-wise, so can you set ground rules? If they see you as a digital dinosaur, how do you encourage them to come to you if they are in trouble, and what actions should you take to prevent, minimize, or resolve the damage?

Packed with real-life scenarios, practical advice, and action plans in non-techspeak, Parent Alert! is your go-to guide for one of the greatest dangers facing children today. Celebrity best friends and concerned parents Nadia Sawalha and Kaye Adams ask the questions, and international security expert Will Geddes provides the no-nonsense answers. Learn best-practice cybersecurity on social media accounts; what signals might indicate that your child is falling prey to online grooming, bullying, or extortion; and how you can protect your kids from danger without being critical of them or setting unrealistic restrictions.

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Parent Hacks: 134 Genius Shortcuts for Life with Kids. Asha Dornfest, $19.95

A parent hack can be as simple as putting the ketchup under the hot dog, minimizing the mess. Or strapping baby into a forward-facing carrier when you need to trim his fingernails — it frees your hands while controlling the squirming. Or stashing a wallet in a disposable diaper at the beach — who would ever poke through what looks like a used Pamper?

On every page, discover easy-to-do, boldly illustrated, unconventional solutions, arranged by category from Pregnancy & Postpartum through Sleep, Eating, Bath Time, Travel, and more.


Parenting for the Digital Age: The Truth Behind Media's Effect on Children, and What to Do About It. Bill Ratner, $23.95

We’ve seen it everywhere, whether a suggestive Halloween costume for a young girl, or a t-shirt for a prepubescent boy that says “Chick Magnet,” or online advertising that is blatantly trying to manipulate kids. The fact is that advertisers and the media have targeted our children with wanton abandon. What effect does this media, whether through television, online, or through mobile devices have on our children? Bill Ratner, a long-time Hollywood insider and voice of their movie trailers, explores with in-depth research the change in advertising since 1982 and what children are currently exposed to. As a parent, educator, and veteran insider to the world of television, movies, and new media, Ratner talks openly about the problems associated with excessive screen time, children’s advertising, and what parents can do about it.


Parenting Through the Storm: How to Handle the Highs, the Lows, and Everything in Between. Ann Douglas, $22.99

Ann Douglas knows what it’s like to parent a child diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Ditto with depression, anorexia, Asperger syndrome and ADHD. Each of her four children has struggled with one or more conditions that fall under the “children’s mental health” umbrella.

From Canada’s bestselling and trusted parenting authority comes this honest and authoritative compendium of advice for parents who are living with children who have mental illnesses. It features interviews with experts on children’s mental health as well as parents and young people who have lived with (or who are living with) mental illness. Drawing on her own experience and expertise, Ann shows how to cope with years of worry and frustration about a child’s behaviour; how to effectively advocate for the child and work through treatments; how to manage siblings’ concerns and emotions; and, most importantly, how to thrive as a family.


Parenting with Presence: Practices for Raising Conscious, Confident, Caring Kids. Susan Stiffelman, $24.50

Our children can be our greatest teachers. Parenting expert Susan Stiffelman writes that the very behaviors that push our buttons — refusing to cooperate or ignoring our requests — can help us build awareness and shed old patterns, allowing us to raise our children with greater ease and enjoyment. Filled with practical advice, powerful exercises, and fascinating stories from her clinical work, Parenting with Presence teaches us how to become the parents we most want to be while raising confident, caring children.

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Parenting Without God: How to Raise Moral, Ethical, and Intelligent Children Free from Religious Dogma. Dan Arel, $17.95

Parenting Without God is for parents who lack belief in a god and who are seeking guidance on raising freethinkers in a Christian-dominated nation. It will help parents give their children the tools to stand up to attempts at religious proselytization, whether by teachers, coaches, friends, or even other family members. It also offers advice on teaching children to question what others tell them and to reach their own conclusions based on evidence and reason. Above all, the book argues that parents should lead by example — both by speaking candidly about the importance of secularism and by living an openly secular life.


Parenting Your Anxious Child with Mindfulness and Acceptance. Christopher McCurry, $25.50

A powerful new approach to overcoming fear, panic and worry using acceptance and commitment therapy.


The Parent's Guide to Baby-Led Weaning: Skip the Purees and Go Straight to Solids! Jennifer House, $19.95

Welcome to an exciting stage in your baby's life: starting solid food! This will be a fun time for both you and your little one as your baby explores new tastes and gains a place at the family table. Jennifer offers you expert advice on everything you need to know to practice baby-led weaning safely and confidently: why you might want to use this method, when to start, what nutrients your baby needs, how to prevent choking, how to deal with allergies and what to feed vegetarian babies. Plus, she answers a ton of real-life questions parents often have when starting baby-led weaning and provides 125 delicious family-friendly recipes. Discover all the wonderful benefits of baby-led weaning — from good nutrition and a decreased risk of picky eating as your baby gets older to faster dexterity development and a healthier overall relationship with food.


A Parent’s Guide to Raising Grieving Children: Rebuilding Your Family after the Death of a Loved One. Phyllis Silverman & Madelyn Kelly, $16.95

A comprehensive, thoughtful and commonsense book, A Parent’s Guide to Raising Grieving Children offers a wealth of solace, sound advice and hope.

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ParentSpeak: What's Wrong with How We Talk to Our Childrenand What to Say Instead. Jennifer Lehr, $22.95

A provocative guide to the hidden dangers of “parentspeak” — those seemingly innocent phrases parents use when speaking to their young children.

Imagine if every time you praise your child with “Good job!” you’re actually doing harm? Or that urging a child to say “Can you say thank you?” is exactly the wrong way to go about teaching manners? Jennifer Lehr is a smart, funny, and fearless writer. Backing up her lively writing and arguments with research from psychologists, educators, and organizations like Alfie Kohn, Thomas Gordon, and R.I.E. (Resources for Infant Educarers), Ms. Lehr offers a conscious approach to parenting based on respect and love for the child as an individual.


Planting Seeds: Practicing Mindfulness with Children. Thich Nhat Hanh and the Plum Village Community, $43.95

A complete overview of all of Thich Nhat Hanh’s practices for children, PLANTING SEEDS is full of hands-on activities to help children and adults relieve stress, increase concentration and confidence, deal with difficult emotions, and improve communication. It includes over 30 full-color illustrations and an audio CD with songs and easy-to-follow practices.


Positive Discipline for Today's Busy & Overwhelmed Parent: How to Balance Work, Parenting & Self for Lasting Well-Being.  Jane Nelsen, Kristina Bill & Joy Marchese, $23.00

With the increasing pressure to excel at parenting, work, and personal relationships, it's easy to feel stressed and dissatisfied. This targeted Positive Discipline guide gives parents the tools to parent effectively without sacrificing their well-being or giving up on their life goals. Instead of creating unachievable expectations, you will instead learn to play to your strengths at work and at home. You’ll integrate your seemingly disparate areas of life and use Positive Discipline to make the most out of your time, energy and relationships. By helping you get to the bottom of the underlying causes of misbehaviour, busy parents will also be able to avoid pampering and keep permissive and punitive parenting at bay. Instead of feeling fragmented and guilty, you’ll have the presence of mind to explore what works best for you and your family.

Attitude is key — we’ll help you feel confident in your parenting abilities and your professional choices, making your children more likely to adopt an attitude of self-reliance and cooperation. Armed with communication strategies and tips for self-reflection, moms (and dads!) won't have to feel guilty about leaving their child with a sitter during the day, or leaving work early to go to a soccer game.

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The Present Parent Handbook: 26 Simple Tools to Discover That This Moment, This Action, This Thought, This Feeling Is Exactly Why I Am Here. Timothy Duke, $20.99

If you can recognize that your child needs to be witnessed, held, and loved by you, he or she will have a chance to thrive. With all the distractions of work, technology, and life in general, The Present Parent Handbook invites parents to be mentally and emotionally available to their children. In the present, there is the opportunity to show up, pay attention, and become the parent you want to be. With an easy-to-follow A-Z format, every parent will be able to implement the 26+ simple tools to become a more present parent for their children.


Raising Great Parents: How to Become the Parent Your Child Needs You to Be. Doone Estey, Beverley Cathcart-Ross & Martin Nash, $22.95

An inspiring and eminently practical book, full of guidance, tips, exercises, and the cumulative understanding of three wise and innovative authors. Written in a friendly "we've been there" style.


Raising Human Beings: Creating a Collaborative Partnership with Your Child. Ross Greene, $22.00

Parents have an important task: figure out who their child is — his or her skills, preferences, beliefs, values, personality traits, goals, and direction — get comfortable with it, and then help him or her pursue and live a life that is congruent with it. But parents also want to have influence. They want their kid to be independent, but not if he or she is going to make bad choices. They don’t want to be harsh and rigid, but nor do they want a noncompliant, disrespectful kid. They want to avoid being too pushy and overbearing, but not if an unmotivated, apathetic kid is what they have to show for it. They want to have a good relationship with their kids, but not if that means being a pushover. They don’t want to scream, but they do want to be heard. Good parenting is about striking the balance between a child’s characteristics and a parent’s desire to have influence.

Now Dr. Ross Greene offers a detailed and practical guide for raising kids in a way that enhances relationships, improves communication, and helps kids learn how to resolve disagreements without conflict. Through his well-known model of solving problems collaboratively, parents can forgo time-out and sticker charts, stop badgering, berating, threatening, and punishing, allow their kids to feel heard and validated, and have influence. From homework to hygiene, curfews, to screen time, Raising Human Beings arms parents with the tools they need to raise kids in ways that are non-punitive and non-adversarial and that brings out the best in both parent and child.

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Raising My Rainbow: Adventures in Raising a Fabulous, Gender Creative Son. Lori Duron, $17.00

RAISING MY RAINBOW is Lori Duron’s frank account of her and her family's adventures of distress and happiness raising a gender-creative son. Whereas her older son, Chase, is a Lego-loving, sports-playing boy's boy, her younger son, C.J., would much rather twirl around in a pink sparkly tutu, with a Disney Princess in each hand while singing Lady Gaga's "Paparazzi."  

C.J. is gender variant or gender nonconforming, whichever you prefer. Whatever the term, Lori has a boy who likes girl stuff — really likes girl stuff. He floats on the gender-variation spectrum from super-macho-masculine on the left all the way to super-girly-feminine on the right. He's not all pink and not all blue. Written in Lori's uniquely witty and warm voice and launched by her incredibly popular blog of the same name, RAISING MY RAINBOW is an unforgettable story.


Recipes for Play: Creative Activities for Small Hands and Big Imaginations. Rachel Summer & Ruth Mitchener, $22.95

An important part of childhood is being curious and trying out new experiences. What do things taste, feel, smell, sound like? What happens when you add red to blue, mix earth with water, or drop a blob of paint from a great height? These childhood experiments are vital for development and provide hours of entertainment. Recipes for Play contains easy and inexpensive ideas for engaging your child’s senses. Many wonderful hours can be spent playing with natural ingredients found in your kitchen cupboard or backyard garden. Make your own face paint in minutes, whip up a batch of oozy slime, create clouds of color with rainbow rice, and so much more.

Sisters Rachel Sumner and Ruth Mitchener have created Recipes for Play for parents and teachers — or anyone with a child in their life — who want to encourage tactile learning but don’t want their lives to be controlled by chaos. Each recipe has easy-to-follow instructions for setting up activities and simple steps for cleaning up once the fun is finished.


Reclaiming Conversation: the Power of Talk in a Digital Age. Sherry Turkle, $35.95

Renowned media scholar Sherry Turkle investigates how a flight from conversation undermines our relationships, creativity, and productivity — and why reclaiming face-to-face conversation can help us regain lost ground. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools, and the workplace, Turkle argues that we have come to a better understanding of where our technology can and cannot take us and that the time is right to reclaim conversation. The most human — and humanizing — thing that we do. The virtues of person-to-person conversation are timeless, and our most basic technology, talk, responds to our modern challenges. We have everything we need to start, we have each other. 

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The Reflective Parent: How to Do Less and Relate More with Your Kids. Regina Pally, $34.95

Figuring out how to raise happy, healthy, and successful kids can be overwhelming. Parents find themselves wading through tons of conflicting advice. Books that outline a “right way” of doing things can leave even the most dedicated caregiver feeling discouraged and inadequate when real life doesn’t measure up. An experienced psychiatrist and founder of the Center for Reflective Communities, Regina Pally serves up something totally different in her book. She argues that the key to successful parenting is learning to slow down, reflect, and recognize that there is no one key to doing it right.

The Reflective Parent synthesizes the latest in neuroscience research to show that our brain’s natural tendencies to empathize, analyze, and connect with others are all we need to be good parents. Each chapter weaves together discussions of specific reflective parenting principles like “Tolerate Uncertainty” and “Repair Ruptures” with engaging explanations of the science that backs them up. Brief “Take Home Lessons” at the end of each chapter and vivid examples of parents and children putting the principles into action make this a highly readable, practical guide for anyone looking to build loving, lasting relationships with their kids.


Reflective Parenting: a Guide to Understanding What's Going On In Your Child's Mind. Alistair Cooper & Sheila Redfern, $42.95

Have you ever wondered what’s going on in your child’s mind? This engaging book shows how reflective parenting can help you understand your children, manage their behaviour and build your relationship and connection with them. It is filled with practical advice showing how recent developments in mentalization, attachment and neuroscience have transformed our understanding of the parent-child relationship and can bring meaningful change to your own family relationships.

Alistair Cooper and Sheila Redfern show you how to make a positive impact on your relationship with your child, starting from the development of the baby’s first relationship with you as parents, to how you can be more reflective in relationships with toddlers, children and young people. Using everyday examples, the authors provide you with practical strategies to develop a more reflective style of parenting and how to use this approach in everyday interactions to help your child achieve their full potential in their development; cognitively, emotionally and behaviourally.

Reflective Parenting is an informative and enriching read for parents, written to help parents form a better relationship with their children. It is also an essential resource for clinicians working with children, young people and families to support them in managing the dynamics of the child-parent relationship. This is a book that every parent needs to read.

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Regulating Screens: Issues in Broadcasting and Internet Governance for Children. André Caron & Ronald Cohen, $24.95

The digital age has carried with it a tsunami of change. Children who have grown up with the delivery platforms that are a part of that change are now able to absorb more and more unregulated media on their own, often without any supervision. Bedroom computers, tablets, and smart phones provide private, individualized access to all kinds of content that may not be suitable for children. What rules and regulations exist to counter this potentially threatening environment?

In REGULATING SCREENS, André Caron and Ronald Cohen examine how governments and non-governmental organizations have been doing their part to make television and the Internet safer for children. In practical terms, they provide parents, educators, and politicians with an up-to-date inventory of the existing laws, codes, and standards in Canada, as well as information on who administers them and how they can be accessed. Given the Internet's global reach, Caron and Cohen also describe access controls in place in the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, and the European Union.


Retro Toddler: More Than 100 Old-School Activities to Boost Development. Anne Zachry, $22.95

You don't need to buy high-tech digital devices, apps, or expensive toys to boost your toddler's brain development! Research shows that the best way for toddlers to learn is through daily, active play — and Retro Toddler includes more than 100 fun, age-appropriate, "old-school" activities that promote the development of language, motor and social skills. The book includes detailed instructions for developmentally stimulating toys that parents and toddlers can make together out of everyday household items. Parents will also learn

  • What's happening inside the rapidly developing brain of a toddler
  • How language, social, fine and gross motor skills develop during the toddler years
  • How different parenting styles can affect a child's development
  • How to successfully praise a child to achieve a growth mindset vs. a fixed mindset
  • How to foster grit and self-control in toddlers
  • The importance of play during the toddler years
  • How excessive screen time is negatively impacting today's young children

With more than 25 years of experience as a pediatric occupational therapist and child development specialist, the author of Retro Toddler will provide you with the research-based information you need to help foster strong growth and development in your toddler — without breaking your budget.

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Safety Starts at Home: the Essential Childproofing Guide DVD. InJoy Videos, $39.99 Note: InJoy DVDs are for Home Use Only; and for sale only within Canada. All other users can contact Parentbooks for more information

  • Fire Safety
  • Burn Hazards
  • Choking, Strangulation, Suffocation Hazards
  • The Safe Baby
  • Preventing Falls
  • Drowning Prevention
  • Poison Patrol
  • Hazards in the Air
  • Preparing for Emergencies
  • Room-by-Room Safety Checklist

Same Family, Different Colors: Confronting Colorism in America's Diverse Families. Lori Tharps, $24.00

Colorism and color bias — the preference for or presumed superiority of people based on the color of their skin — is a pervasive and damaging but rarely openly discussed phenomenon. In this unprecedented book, Lori Tharps explores the issue in African American, Latino, Asian American, and mixed-race families and communities by weaving together personal stories, history, and analysis.

Tharps, the mother of three mixed-race children with three distinct skin colors, uses her own family as a starting point to investigate how skin-color difference is dealt with. Her journey takes her across the country and into the lives of dozens of diverse individuals, all of whom have grappled with skin-color politics and speak candidly about experiences that sometimes scarred them. From a Latina woman who was told she couldn’t be in her best friend’s wedding photos because her dark skin would “spoil” the pictures, to a light-skinned African American man who spent his entire childhood “trying to be Black,” Tharps illuminates the complex and multifaceted ways that colorism affects our self-esteem and shapes our lives and relationships. Along with intimate and revealing stories, Tharps adds a historical overview and a contemporary cultural critique to contextualize how various communities and individuals navigate skin-color politics.


Scattered Seeds: In Search of Family and Identity in the Sperm Donor Generation. Jacqueline Mroz, $22.49

As typical as donor-conceived children have become, their experiences are still unusual in many ways. In Scattered Seeds, journalist and writer Jacqueline Mroz looks at the growth of sperm donation and assisted reproduction and how it affects the children who are born, the women who buy and use the sperm to have kids, and the sperm donors who donate their genetic material to help others procreate. With empathy and in-depth analysis, Scattered Seeds explores the sociology, psychology, and anthropology surrounding those connected with fertility procedures today and looks back at the history that brought us to this point.

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Scientific Parenting: What Science Reveals about Parental Influence. Nicole Letourneau, $24.99

Combining the expertise of its author — a celebrated expert in parent-infant mental health and mother of two — with the latest findings in gene-by-environment interactions, epigenetics, behavioural science, and attachment theory, SCIENTIFIC PARENTING describes how children's genes determine their sensitivity to good or bad parenting, how environmental cues can switch critical genes on or off, and how addictive tendencies and mental health problems can become hardwired into the human brain. The book traces conditions as diverse as heart disease, obesity, and depression to their origins in early childhood. It brings readers to the frontier of developmental research, unlocking the fascinating scientific discoveries currently hidden away in academic tomes and scholarly journals. Above all, SCIENTIFIC PARENTING explains why parenting really matters and how parents' smallest actions can transform their children's lives.


The Self-Driven Child: the Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives. William Stixrud & Ned Johnson, $37.00

A few years ago, Bill Stixrud and Ned Johnson started noticing the same problem from different angles: Even high-performing kids were coming to them acutely stressed and lacking motivation. Many complained they had no control over their lives. Some stumbled in high school or hit college and unraveled. Bill is a clinical neuropsychologist who helps kids gripped by anxiety or struggling to learn. Ned is a motivational coach who runs an elite tutoring service. Together they discovered that the best antidote to stress is to give kids more of a sense of control over their lives. But this doesn’t mean giving up your authority as a parent. In this groundbreaking book they reveal how you can actively help your child to sculpt a brain that is resilient, and ready to take on new challenges.

The Self-Driven Child offers a combination of cutting-edge brain science, the latest discoveries in behavioral therapy, and case studies drawn from the thousands of kids and teens Bill and Ned have helped over the years to teach you how to set your child on the real road to success. As parents, we can only drive our kids so far. At some point, they will have to take the wheel and map out their own path. But there is a lot you can do before then to help them tackle the road ahead with resilience and imagination.

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Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life. Stuart Shanker, with Teresa Barker, $20.00

There is no such thing as a bad kid. According to world-renowned psychologist Stuart Shanker, even the most frustrating, annoying or troubling behaviour has an explanation. That means there is a way to make things better.

Shanker's research has shown that for every child and every adult the ability to thrive — to complete tasks, form friendships, learn, and even love — depends on being able to self-regulate. In the past twenty years neurobiological research has been showing us a lot about brain states, and what is clear now is that the ability to self-regulate in response to stress is central. There are dramatic consequences to looking at a child's behaviour through the lens of self-regulation. Above all it discards the knee-jerk reaction that a child who is having trouble paying attention, controlling his impulses, or who gives up easily on a difficult task, is somehow weak or lacks self-discipline, or is not making a great enough effort to apply himself.

According to Shanker, the ability to deal effectively with stress is limited, though. Like a tank of gas, our energy reserves eventually dwindle, leaving a kid — or an adult — simply unable to control his or her impulses. And what draws down our reserves? Excessive stress. Stress of all kinds, from social anxiety to an uncomfortable chair. Reduce the stress loads, and problems quickly dissipate. Dr. Shanker offers practical, prescriptive advice for parents — giving them concrete ways to develop their own self-regulation skills and teach their children to do the same.


Setting Limits — Discipline that Works. Clear and sensible approaches to negative behavior. $14.95, audio CD 

These lively and informative recordings will give you the skills and tools you need to be a better parent.

Thousands of families have found they can dramatically improve the level of family co-operation, respect and closeness in their families thanks to the parenting skills they have learned from Beverley Cathcart-Ross and Gill Deacon. Each recording is packed with 60 minutes or more of practical solutions, tools, examples, and the language so important to being a positive leader for your children.

Other audio CDs in this series:

  • What's Your Style — Too tough or too permissive? $14.95
  • Self-Esteem — Encouragement skills that bring out the best in you and your family. $14.95
  • Who's the Boss — Solutions for defiance, dawdling and other power struggles. $14.95
  • Keeping the Peace — How to work cooperatively with your child. $14.95

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SEX is a Funny Word: a Book about Bodies, Feelings, and YOU. Cory Silverberg & Fiona Smyth. $23.95

A comic book for kids that includes children and families of all makeups, orientations, and gender identities, Sex Is a Funny Word is an essential resource about bodies, gender, and sexuality for children ages 8 to 10 as well as their parents and caregivers. Topics covered include:

  • What is sex?
  • Privacy, safety, and respect
  • Boundaries regarding nudity, talking about sex, and touch
  • Assigned sex, gender identity, and gender roles
  • Names and functions of body parts
  • Talking about the word “sexy”
  • Protecting yourself against unwanted sexual touch and abuse
  • Crushes, love, and sexy feelings 

Much more than the "facts of life" or “the birds and the bees," Sex Is a Funny Word opens up conversations between young people and their caregivers in a way that allows adults to convey their values and beliefs while providing information about boundaries, safety, and joy. Sex Is a Funny Word is the first sex education book for this age group that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, and bisexual experience as well as gender creative and gender nonconforming children.


The Simple Guide to Sensitive Boys: How to Nurture Children and Avoid Trauma. Betsy de Thierry, $21.95

Too often, adults think of sensitive boys as shy, anxious and inhibited. They are measured against society's ideas about 'manliness' — that all boys are sociable, resilient and have endless supplies of energy. This highly readable guide is for any adult wanting to know how to understand and celebrate sensitive boys. It describes how thinking about boys in such old-fashioned ways can cause great harm, and make a difficult childhood all the more painful. The book highlights the real strengths shared by many sensitive boys — of being compassionate, highly creative, thoughtful, fiercely intelligent and witty. It also flips common negative clichés about sensitive boys being shy, anxious and prone to bullying to ask instead: what we can do to create a supportive environment in which they will flourish?

Full of simple yet sage advice, this book will help you to encourage boys to embrace their individuality, find their own place in the world, and to be the best they can be.


Sitting Still Like a Frog: Mindfulness Exercises for Kids (and Their Parents). Eline Snel, $19.95

Simple mindfulness practices to help your child deal with anxiety, improve concentration, and handle difficult emotions. The accompanying CD has guided meditations to help children calm down, manage anger, fall asleep easily, and generally become more patient and aware.

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Sleepless Nights and Kisses for Breakfast: Reflections on Fatherhood. Matteo Bussola, $24.00

Matteo Bussola is a designer and cartoonist who lives in Verona, Italy with his wife Paola; their three young daughters, Virginia, Ginevra, and Melania (ages eight, four, and two); and their two dogs. For two years, he’s been writing posts on Facebook capturing the beauty of ordinary moments with his family. Sleepless Nights and Kisses for Breakfast is the memoir that grew out of these writings. Divided into winter, spring, summer, and fall, the book follows the different seasons of parenthood and life. At times moving, and at others humorous, these writings remind people to savor the present and appreciate the simple things in life.


The Story Cure: an A-Z of Books to Keep Kids Happy, Healthy and Wise. Ella Berthoud & Susan Elderkin, $30.50

A literary first aid kit of book recommendations for children of all ages. From tantrums to tummy aches to teenage mood swings, there are times when a book is the best medicine of all. The Story Cure is a manual for grown-ups who believe that the stories which shape children's lives should not be left to chance.

In these pages bibliotherapists Ella and Susan recommend the perfect children's book — from picture books to YA novels via the golden world of chapter books — for every hiccup and heartache. Whether the young child you know is being bullied, the toddler can't sleep, or the teenager has fallen in love for the first time — or just doesn't know what to read next — the right story will help them feel themselves again. Packed full of helpful lists of the best books to read when turning ten or going through a spy/horse/superhero phase, you'll find old favourites such as The Borrowers and The Secret Garden alongside modern classics by MT Anderson, Malorie Blackman and Frank Cottrell Boyce. The Story Cure is the perfect companion for initiating young readers into one of life's greatest pleasures.


The Strength Switch: How the New Science of Strength-Based Parenting Can Help Your Child and Your Teen to Flourish. Lea Waters, $36.00

This game-changing book shows us the extraordinary results of focusing on our children’s strengths rather than always trying to correct their weaknesses. Most parents struggle with this shift because they suffer from a negativity bias, thanks to evolutionary development, giving them “strengths-blindness.” By showing us how to throw the “strengths switch,” Lea Waters demonstrates how we can not only help our children build resilience, optimism, and achievement but we can also help inoculate them against today’s pandemic of depression and anxiety.

As a strengths-based scientist for more than twenty years, ten of them spent focusing on strengths-based parenting, Waters has seen how this approach enhances self-esteem and energy in both children and teenagers. Yet more on the plus side: parents find it a particularly exciting and rewarding way to raise children. With many suggestions for specific ways to interact with your kids, Waters demonstrates how to discover strengths and talents in our children, how to use positive emotions as a resource, how to build strong brains, and even how to deal with problem behaviors and talk about difficult situations and emotions. As revolutionary yet simple as Mindset and Grit, The Strength Switch will show parents how a small shift can yield enormous results.

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Sulky, Rowdy, Rude? Why Kids Really Act Out and What to Do about It. Bo Hejlskov Elvén & Tina Wiman, $19.95

Children can go through difficult phases — this is a natural part of growing up. Conflicts and arguments are nothing exceptional, but rather a part of everyday family life. The authors of this practical and imaginative book show how parents can create consistent and effective structures, methods and responses, so that children can learn for themselves how to practise self-control and cooperation in a secure environment where they both belong and have autonomy.

Based on years of experience working with children, including those with special needs, the authors structure their methods around the low arousal approach. With many creative suggestions and real-life examples, this book has the potential to change family life for the better forever.


10 Things Girls Need Most to Grow Up Strong and Free. Steve Biddulph, $29.99

In answer to the crisis in girls’ mental health, Steve Biddulph brings an interactive learning guide rich in content and interactive elements to help parents be prepared and self-aware in providing for their daughters. The best-selling author of Raising Girls, psychologist and parent educator offers an interactive experience for parents to explore the relationship with their girls from the cradle to the teenager.

It is a guided journey of exercises, conversations, reflections and self-rating questionnaires that builds the inner capacities in a parent, targeted at each stage of their daughters growing up. Every aspect — love and security in babyhood, mindfulness, setting boundaries, emotional well-being and emotional literacy, education and learning in primary and secondary school, friendship, puberty and adolescence, sexuality and sexualization, choosing partners and negotiating equality and respect — in fact everything a father or mother needs to think about to be prepared and self-aware in providing for their growing girl.


There's No Such Thing as Bad Weather: a Scandinavian Mom's Secrets for Raising Healthy, Resilient, and Confident Kids. Linda Åkeson McGurk, $33.99

When Swedish-born Linda McGurk moved to small-town Indiana with her American husband to start a family, she quickly realized that her outdoorsy ways were not the norm. In Sweden children play outside all year round, regardless of the weather, and letting young babies nap outside in freezing temperatures is not only common — it is a practice recommended by physicians. In the US, on the other hand, she found that the playgrounds, which she had expected to find teeming with children, were mostly deserted. In preschool, children were getting drilled to learn academic skills, while their Scandinavian counterparts were climbing trees, catching frogs, and learning how to compost. Worse, she realized that giving her daughters the same freedom to play outside that she had enjoyed as a child in Sweden could quickly lead to a visit by Child Protective Services.

The brewing culture clash finally came to a head when McGurk was fined for letting her children play in a local creek, setting off an online firestorm when she expressed her anger and confusion on her blog. The rules and parenting philosophies of her native country and her adopted homeland were worlds apart.

Struggling to fit in and to decide what was best for her children, McGurk turned to her own childhood for answers. Could the Scandinavian philosophy of “there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes” be the key to better lives for her American children? And how would her children’s relationships with nature change by introducing them to Scandinavian concepts like friluftsliv (“open-air living”) and hygge (the coziness and the simple pleasures of home)? McGurk embarked on a six-month-long journey to Sweden to find out. There’s No Such Thing as Bad Weather is a fascinating personal narrative that highlights the importance of spending time outdoors, and illustrates how the Scandinavian culture could hold the key to raising healthier, resilient, and confident children in America.

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Thicker Than Blood: Adoptive Parenting in the Modern World. Marion Crook, $18.95

Thicker Than Blood is a comprehensive yet down-to-earth look at adoptive parenting in the twenty-first century. Author Marion Crook's family includes two adopted sons; in her experience, adoptive parents need to acquire skills, knowledge, and a good sense of humour in order to deal with the emotional upheavals of raising adopted children.

The book looks at all facets of adoption, including its dark history over the past 100 years when it was seen as a lower-class option for desperate parents, or when children were taken from single mothers against their will. Today, adoption is much more open-minded ― LGBT adoptive parents and adoptive single parents are now commonplace ― yet challenges linger, from adoptive children suffering from PTSD to those dealing with issues of anger and abandonment. Marion Crook gently takes adoptive parents through the process of adoption from childhood to adulthood, helping to demystify the experience with compassion and reassurance.

Meticulously researched but refreshingly free of academic jargon, Thicker Than Blood will enlighten and empower adoptive parents and those who work with adopted children alike.


Think Like a Baby: 33 Simple Research Experiments You Can Do at Home to Better Understand Your Child's Developing Mind. Amber Ankowski & Andy Ankowski, $19.95

Raising a baby is joyful, amazing... and ridiculously difficult. But with some insight into what's actually going on inside your little one's head, your job as a parent can become a little bit easier — and a lot more fun. In Think Like a Baby, coauthors Amber and Andy Ankowski — The Doctor and the Dad — show parents how to re-create classic child development experiments using common household items.

These simple step-by-step experiments apply from the third trimester through age seven and beyond and help parents understand their children's physical, cognitive, language, and social development. Amazed parents won't just read about how their kids are behaving, changing, and thinking at various stages, they'll actually see it for themselves while interacting and having fun with them at the same time.


This Is Ridiculous This Is Amazing: Parenthood in 71 Lists. Jason Good, $20.95

Blogging sensation and family man Jason Good delivers a laugh-out-loud reminder that everything is easier and more fun when approached with a sense of humor — especially parenting. Each list captures a perfect (or perfectly terrible) aspect of parenthood while wholeheartedly embracing every moment: "You Deserve a Break" offers ideas for downtime, such as giving blood and untangling cords, while "Self-Help from a Three-Year-Old" collects such wisdom as "If you fall down, stay down. Someone will pick you up eventually." Sweet, sincere, and oh-so-true, this is the ideal gift for parents who could use a laugh. And isn't that every single one of them?

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To Change a Mind: Parenting to Promote Maturity in Teenagers. John McKinnon, $32.95

Using case studies gathered from his years helping parents with troubled adolescents, the author explores the ways that adolescent development can be derailed in today’s complex culture and how parents can prevent this from happening in the first place. Dr. McKinnon writes about how parents need to recognize their children as individuals, with their own feelings and opinions, as they start to establish their separate identities as young people and begin to negotiate their way through high school and beyond. He also makes clear that parents must continue to establish limits.

Packed with examples and sensible and practical advice for parents of pre-teens and teenagers, To Change a Mind is an essential guidebook for parents seeking to make their lives — and the lives of their children — richer and more fulfilling, as the family navigates together the potentially treacherous seas of adolescence.


Transitions of the Heart: Stories of Love, Struggle and Acceptance by Mothers of Transgender and Gender Variant Children.  Edited by Rachel Pepper, $24.95

TRANSITIONS OF THE HEART is the first collection to invite mothers of transgender and gender variant children to tell their own stories. Often "transitioning" socially and emotionally alongside their children, parents have their own parallel process to work through, and few resources to depend on. Editor Rachel Pepper has gathered voices of women from all walks of life, with children ranging in age from six to sixty, to share their experiences. These mothers have learned how to advocate for their children and themselves. By speaking out here, they are blazing a brave trail for others to follow.


Untying Parent Anxiety (Years 5–8): 18 Myths that Have You in Knots — And How to Get Free. Lisa Sugarman, $23.99

In Untying Parent Anxiety, nationally syndicated humor columnist and author Lisa Sugarman reminds us that our kids aren’t supposed to be perfect. (And neither are we.) They’re going to screw up, make mistakes, and lose their way. And as soon as we embrace the idea that parenthood is not a straight line, we unlock everyone’s full potential.

Drawing on her life as the perfectly imperfect mother of two daughters and more than a decade of working in the school system, Sugarman deconstructs some of the biggest myths facing parents and offers advice and strategies to help soothe anxious moms and dads. Cycling through everything from friend drama and separation anxiety to playing nice and emotional development, Untying Parent Anxiety is a funny but honest journey through the most common stages of raising kids that reinforces that parenthood is a beautiful, imperfect work in progress.


The Vaccination Picture. Timothy Caulfield, $32.95

Few topics in health policy have generated as much debate — and frustration — among public health experts as the issue of vaccine safety. Misinformation around the science of vaccination continues to spread, and too often the media fails to report bad science for what it is.

Using science-informed analysis alongside original art and powerful essays, health science leader Timothy Caulfield debunks the myths and false assumptions about vaccination safety and effectiveness. Accessible, informative, and entertaining, The Vaccination Picture tells the true story of vaccines, their uses, and their positive effects for everyone.

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VentureGirls: Raising Girls to Be Tomorrow's Leaders. Cristal Glanghai, $21.00

From an engineer and entrepreneur, a conversation-changing parenting book about how to engage young women in science, technology, engineering, and math, filled with practical advice for both parents and educators.

 As the female CEO of a tech startup, Dr. Cristal Glangchai was outnumbered twenty to one. At Google, Twitter, and Facebook, women currently fill just ten to twenty percent of technical jobs. While career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math have increased dramatically in the past twenty years, the achievement gap between men and women has only grown wider. In VentureGirls, Glangchai argues that a key part of raising strong, confident young women is giving them the tools of entrepreneurship to engage in STEM.

Entrepreneurship is a skill-set and a way of thinking that is particularly useful in the fields of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. Entrepreneurship involves identifying needs, brainstorming creative solutions, innovating, and taking calculated risks. In short, it’s about having a vision and making it a reality. Deeply informative, warm, and grounded in real-world experience, VentureGirls includes a plethora of activities and lessons that focus on strengthening kids’ ingenuity and resilience. VentureGirls is essential reading for anyone who wants to raise girls and young women who realize their strength, engage in the world, and feel empowered to make a positive impact.


Vitamin N: 500 Ways to Enrich the Health & Happiness of Your Family and Community. Richard Louv, $23.95

From Richard Louv, the bestselling author who defined the term “nature-deficit disorder,” Vitamin N (for “nature”) is a complete prescription for connecting with the power and joy of the natural world right now, Vitamin N is a practical guidebook for the whole family, offering parents eager to share nature with their kids tips, activities, and ideas for young and old alike.


Waking Up: a Parent's Guide to Mindful Awareness and Connection. Raelynn Maloney, $20.95

Practice the MindfulWay of aware parenting and strengthen your relationship with your child.

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Welcome to Your Child's Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College. Sandra Aamodt & Sam Wang, $17.00

How children think is one of the most enduring mysteries-and difficulties-encountered by parents. In an effort to raise our children smarter, happier, stronger, and better, parents will try almost anything, from vitamins to toys to DVDs. But how can we tell marketing from real science? And what really goes through your kid's growing mind-as an infant, in school, and during adolescence?

Neuroscientists Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang explain the facets and functions of the developing brain, discussing salient subjects such as sleep problems, language learning, gender differences, and autism. They dispel common myths about important subjects such as the value of educational videos for babies, the meaning of ADHD in the classroom, and the best predictor of academic success (hint: It's not IQ ). Most of all, this book helps you know when to worry, how to respond, and, most important, when to relax. Welcome to Your Child's Brain upends myths and misinformation with practical advice, surprising revelations, and real, reliable science. It's essential reading for parents of children of any age, from infancy well into their teens.


Welcoming a New Brother or Sister through Adoption. Arleta James, $26.95

Adoption is a big step which changes the whole dynamics of the family. It is crucial that parents understand the impact it has when new sibling relationships are forged and an adoptee becomes a part of the family. WELCOMING A NEW BROTHER OR SISTER THROUGH ADOPTION is a comprehensive yet accessible guide that describes the adoption process and the impact of adoption on every member of the family, including the adopted child. It prepares families to have realistic expectations and equips them with knowledge to deal with a host of situations that may arise, addressing difficult questions head-on, and exploring solutions in detail. All this is accompanied with real life stories and direct quotes from children, which make it a realistic and insightful resource. This book is vital reading for adoptive families and professionals who work with them including social workers, counselors and psychologists.


Well Played: the Ultimate Guide to Awakening Your Family's Playful Spirit. Meredith Sinclair, $24.99

In our age of digital addiction, many of us have lost our ability to be spontaneous. More parents are complaining that they no longer even remember how to play with their children, or their spouse, and even with their own friends. In Well Played, Meredith Sinclair helps families relearn what used to come naturally and shows how to find happiness through play. For children, playing comes naturally, or at least it used to. But today that kind of easy-going fun is harder to come by, for both kids and their parents. With hectic lifestyles and constant technology overload, families have simply forgotten how to play. The solution? Relearn how to integrate fun and creative play into our day-to-day lives.

Packed with fun and engaging line drawings, entertaining DIY projects, and hundreds of lists and tips on capturing the game-changing joy of goofing off, Well Played is an indispensable guide for families to incorporate quality fun and playtime into our daily lives. 

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What Kind of Parent Am I? Self-Surveys That Reveal the Impact of Toxic Stress and More. Nicole Letourneau, $17.99

Toxic stress can occur in any home, rich or poor, regardless of age, education, or walk of life. Research has shown that adaptive, supportive parents are the best at insulating their children from all but the biggest catastrophes. Exposure to “toxic stress” in childhood can cause depression, alcoholism, obesity, violent behaviour, heart disease, and even cancer in adulthood. Parents who are less sensitive or attentive or who regularly misinterpret their children’s needs can let too much stress trickle through, or even cause it in the first place, which can carry on to the next generation.

What Kind of Parent Am I? uses specially created surveys to identify problem areas for parents. With recommended resources and advice throughout, Dr. Letourneau informs and empowers parents to deal directly with their unique risks and challenges, helping them become the best parents they can be.


What Makes a Baby? A Book for Every Kind of Family and Every Kind of Kid. Cory Silverberg, illustrated by Fiona Smyth, $16.95

This amazing, wonderful, delightful book tells the story of where babies come from. While it doesn’t include any information on sexual intercourse, donor insemination, fertility treatments, surrogacy or adoption, it does give the facts of how babies are made in the most open, accurate and inclusive manner imaginable. A book to be shared and cherished.


Where's the Mother? Stories from a Transgender Dad. Trevor MacDonald, $21.99

In a time when to most people “pregnancy” automatically means “motherhood,” what is it like to get pregnant, give birth, and breastfeed a child — all while being an out transgender man?

When Trevor MacDonald decided to start a family, he knew that the world was going to have questions for him.  Luckily for the reader, Trevor responds with grace and humour.  His stories convey the intimate and sometimes surprising realities of the transgender parenting experience. This memoir is a book about being a breastfeeding parent and a transgender man, and the many beautiful, moving, and difficult ways these two identities collide.


Why Gender Matters: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know About the Emerging Science of Sex Differences, 2nd Edition. Leonard Sax, $22.99

Eleven years ago, Why Gender Matters broke ground in illuminating the differences between boys and girls–how they perceive the world differently, how they learn differently, how they process emotions and take risks differently. Dr. Sax argued that in failing to recognize these hardwired differences between boys and girls, we ended up reinforcing damaging stereotypes, medicalizing normal behavior (see: the rising rates of ADHD diagnosis), and failing to support kids to reach their full potential. In the intervening decade, the world has changed drastically, with an avalanche of new research which supports, deepens, and expands Dr. Sax’s work. This revised and updated edition includes new findings about how boys and girls interact differently with social media and video games; a completely new discussion of research on gender non-conforming, LGB, and transgender kids, new findings about how girls and boys see differently, hear differently, and even smell differently; and new material about the medicalization of bad behavior.

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The Wonder Weeks, Revised Edition. Hetty van de Rijt & Frans Plooij, $29.95

How to stimulate the most important developmental weeks in your baby's first 20 months, and turn these ten predictable, great, fussy phases into magical leaps forward!

  • See the world through your baby’s perspective
  • Learn how to encourage each leap foreword
  • Help your baby with the three C's of fussy behavior Cranky, Clingy, Crying
  • Know which games and toys are best during each key week
  • Use calendars, charts and checklists to make sense of their behavior
  • Week-by-week guide to baby’s behavior

The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience In Your Child. Daniel Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson, $36.00

When facing challenges, unpleasant tasks, and contentious issues such as homework, screen time, food choices, and bedtime, children often act out or shut down, responding with reactivity instead of receptivity. This is what New York Times bestselling authors Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson call a No Brain response. But our kids can be taught to approach life with openness and curiosity. Parents can foster their children’s ability to say yes to the world and welcome all that life has to offer, even during difficult times. This is what it means to cultivate a Yes Brain.

When kids work from a Yes Brain, they’re more willing to take chances and explore. They’re more curious and imaginative, less worried about making mistakes. They’re better at relationships and more flexible and resilient when it comes to handling adversity and big feelings. They work from a clear internal compass that directs their decisions, as well as the way they treat others. Guided by their Yes Brain, they become more open, creative, and resilient. In The Yes Brain, the authors give parents skills, scripts, ideas, and activities to bring kids of all ages into the overwhelmingly beneficial “yes” state.

With inspirational anecdotes, fun and helpful illustrations, and a handy Yes Brain Refrigerator Sheet to keep your family on point, The Yes Brain is an essential tool for nurturing positive potential and keeping your child’s inner spark glowing and growing strong—and gifting your children with a life of rich relational connections, meaningful interactions with the world, and emotional equanimity.


Yoga for Children: 200+ Yoga Poses, Breathing Exercises, and Meditations for Healthier, Happier, More Resilient Children. Lisa Flynn, $18.99

YOGA FOR CHILDREN will encourage your child to learn about yoga with an attentive, at-home instructor - you! Even if you are new to the practice, author, mom, and children's yoga expert Lisa Flynn will guide you and your child through more than 200 yoga poses, meditations, and activities that are suitable for children between the ages of two and twelve. Complete with full-color photographs, instructional scripts, and pose modifications, YOGA FOR CHILDREN will help build your child's confidence, self-awareness, and focus while strengthening your connection, one yoga session at a time.

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Your Baby Skin to Skin: Learn to Trust Your Baby's Instincts In the First Year. Rachel Fitz-Desorgher, $22.99

Your Baby Skin to Skin takes parents on a reassuring and practical journey through your baby’s first year grounded in the knowledge the baby is a highly evolved being with an instinct to survive. Experienced midwife Rachel Fitz-Desorgher shows by responding to your baby's needs, you can't parent 'wrong' and can become a confident and nurturing parent.


Your Self-Motivated Baby: Enhance Your Baby's Social and Cognitive Development in the First Six Months of Life through Movement. Beverly Stokes, $32.49

A hands-on guide for communicating with babies in their first six months and nurturing their physical, social, and cognitive development, Your Self-Motivated Baby shows parents and other caregivers how to interact with very young infants and understand what they are expressing in their movements. Color photographs throughout the book show babies' motivation in play and how subtle interactions build bonding and encourage development. Following advice from author Beverly Stokes, a seasoned developmental movement educator, adults learn how to relate to babies and communicate effectively with them. Beverly Stokes makes it clear that preverbal babies are giving cues for caregiver participation very early on; it's up to us to try to understand them better. By communicating with babies sensitively in the first six months of their lives, we help them to establish the foundation for a healthy, confident, and joyful life. 


You're Ruining My Life! Surviving the Teenage Years with Connected Parenting. Jennifer Kolari, $21.00

In her new book, Jennifer Kolari applies her empathic approach to parenting to what may be the most difficult time for parents — adolescence. Combining her own experience as a therapist with the most recent scientific information about mental processes, she explains what's going on inside the teenage brain as well as what's going on in their world. This understanding allows parents to de-escalate confrontations by applying techniques such as CALM (Connect, Affect, Listen, Mirror) that bypass language and go directly to the part of the brain that regulates emotion. By understanding how teens think (or don't think) parents come to see why it's so important to create and maintain a strong emotional bond that will allow their almost grown-up children to correct and contain unacceptable behaviours.


Zero to Five: 70 Essential Parenting Tips Based on Science (and What I've Learned So Far). Tracy Cutchlow, $21.95

When you're a new parent, the miracle of life might not always feel so miraculous. Maybe your latest 2:00 a.m., 2:45 a.m., and 3:30 a.m. wake-up calls have left you wondering how "sleep like a baby" ever became a figure of speech — and what the options are for restoring your sanity. Or your child just left bite marks on someone, and you're wondering how to handle it.

First-time mom Tracy Cutchlow knows what you're going through. In Zero to Five: 70 Essential Parenting Tips Based on Science (and What I've Learned So Far), she takes dozens of parenting tips based on scientific research and distills them into something you can easily digest during one of your two-minute-long breaks in the day. The pages are beautifully illustrated by award-winning photojournalist Betty Udesen. Whether you read the book front to back or skip around, Zero to Five will help you make the best of the tantrums (yours and baby's), moments of pure joy, and other surprises along the totally-worth-it journey of parenting.

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Address: 121 Harbord Street,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1G9

Phone: 416-537-8334

Fax: 416-537-9499

Toll-free: 1-800-209-9182

E-mail:   Inquiries    Sales

Open 10:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday-Friday
Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday

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