Teens

Adulthood Is a Myth: a Sarah's Scribbles Collection. Sarah Andersen, $16.99

These casually drawn, perfectly on-point comics by the hugely popular young Brooklyn-based artist Sarah Andersen document the wasting of entire beautiful weekends on the internet, the unbearable agony of holding hands on the street with a gorgeous guy, and dreaming all day of getting home and back into pajamas. In other words, the horrors and awkwardness of young modern life. Oh and they are totally not autobiographical. At all.

Adulthood Is a Myth presents many fan favorites plus dozens of all-new comics exclusive to this book. Like the work of fellow Millennial authors Allie Brosh, Grace Helbig, and Gemma Correll, Sarah's frankness on personal issues like body image, self-consciousness, introversion, relationships, and the frequency of bra-washing makes her comics highly relatable and deeply hilarious.


We Are All Made of Molecules. Susin Nielsen, $12.99 (novel, ages 12-14)

Thirteen-year-old Stewart Inkster is academically brilliant but "ungifted" socially. Fourteen-year-old Ashley Anderson is the undisputed "It" girl of grade nine, but her marks stink. Their worlds are about to collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. "The Brady Bunch" it isn't. Stewart is trying to be 89.9% happy about it, but Ashley is 110% horrified. She already has to hide the truth behind her parents' divorce; "Spewart" could further threaten her position at the top of the social ladder. They are complete opposites. And yet, no matter their differences, they share one thing in common: they, like the rest of us, are all made of molecules.

Written in alternating voices, Susin Nielsen deftly explores family tragedy and family ties; sibling rivalry and union; and adolescent confusion and revelation.


Becoming Nicole: the Transformation of an American Family. Amy Ellis Nutt, $22.00

Becoming Nicole chronicles a journey that could have destroyed a family but instead brought it closer together. It’s the story of a mother whose instincts told her that her child needed love and acceptance, not ostracism and disapproval; of a Republican, Air Force veteran father who overcame his deepest fears to become a vocal advocate for trans rights; of a loving brother who bravely stuck up for his twin sister; and of a town forced to confront its prejudices, a school compelled to rewrite its rules, and a courageous community of transgender activists determined to make their voices heard. Ultimately, Becoming Nicole is the story of an extraordinary girl who fought for the right to be herself.

Granted wide-ranging access to personal diaries, home videos, clinical journals, legal documents, medical records, and the Maineses themselves, Amy Ellis Nutt spent almost four years reporting this immersive account of an American family confronting an issue that is at the center of today’s cultural debate. Becoming Nicole will resonate with anyone who’s ever raised a child, felt at odds with society’s conventions and norms, or had to embrace life when it plays out unexpectedly. It’s a story of standing up for your beliefs and yourself — and it will inspire all of us to do the same.


Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen. Jazz Jennings, $23.99

Jazz Jennings is one of the youngest and most prominent voices in the national discussion about gender identity. At the age of five, Jazz transitioned to life as a girl, with the support of her parents. A year later, her parents allowed her to share her incredible journey in her first Barbara Walters interview, aired at a time when the public was much less knowledgeable or accepting of the transgender community. This groundbreaking interview was followed over the years by other high-profile interviews, a documentary, the launch of her YouTube channel, a picture book, and her own reality TV series — I Am Jazz — making her one of the most recognizable activists for transgender teens, children, and adults.

In her remarkable memoir, Jazz reflects on these very public experiences and how they have helped shape the mainstream attitude toward the transgender community. But it hasn't all been easy. Jazz has faced many challenges, bullying, discrimination, and rejection, yet she perseveres as she educates others about her life as a transgender teen. Through it all, her family has been beside her on this journey, standing together against those who don't understand the true meaning of tolerance and unconditional love. Now Jazz must learn to navigate the physical, social, and emotional upheavals of adolescence — particularly high school — complicated by the unique challenges of being a transgender teen. Making the journey from girl to woman is never easy — especially when you began your life in a boy's body.


On Thin Ice. Jamie Bastedo, $14.95 (novel, ages 13+)

In a tiny Arctic hamlet, a teenager's mangled body is found lying on the ice. Could a rapidly changing Arctic climate have driven a polar bear, starving and afraid, this close to human habitation? On Thin Ice is the story of Ashley Anowiak, a gifted northern youth struggling to understand her spiritual connection to polar bears. While seeking answers about her culture, climate and environment seem to be crumbling all around her.

This 2006 Alberta YA Book of the Year also has a Companion Teacher's Guide, Polar Bears in a Climate of Change, which includes a novel study. (Available online when the book is purchased).


Fragile Bones: Harrison & Anna. Lorna Schultz Nicholson, $12.95

Meet Harrison and Anna. One is a fifteen-year-old boy with an uncanny ability to recite every bone in the skeletal system whenever he gets anxious ― and that happens a lot. The meaning of “appropriate behaviour” mystifies him: he doesn’t understand most people and they certainly don’t understand him. The other is a graduating senior with the world at her feet. Joining the Best Buddies club at her school and pairing up with a boy with Aspergers/autism is the perfect addition to her med school applications. Plus, the president of the club is a rather attractive, if mysterious, added bonus.

Told in the alternating voices of Harrison and Anna, Fragile Bones is the story of two teens whose lives intertwine in unexpected ways. 


Skin and Bones. Sherry Shahan, $13.99 (novel)

Sixteen-year-old Jack, nicknamed "Bones," won't eat. His roommate in the eating disorder ward has the opposite problem and proudly goes by the nickname "Lard." They become friends despite Bones's initial reluctance. When Bones meets Alice, a dangerously thin dancer who loves to break the rules, he lets his guard down even more. Soon Bones is so obsessed with Alice that he's willing to risk everything — even his recovery. 


Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights. Ann Bausum, $19.99

In 1969 being gay in the United States was a criminal offense. It meant living a closeted life or surviving on the fringes of society. People went to jail, lost jobs, and were disowned by their families for being gay. Most doctors considered homosexuality a mental illness. There were few safe havens. The Stonewall Inn, a Mafia-run, filthy, overpriced bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village was one of them.

Police raids on gay bars happened regularly in this era. But one hot June night, when cops pounded on the door of the Stonewall, almost nothing went as planned. Tension was high, the crowd refused to go away. Anger and frustration boiled over.

The raid became a riot.

The riot became a catalyst.

The catalyst triggered an explosive demand for gay rights.

Ann Bausum's riveting exploration of the Stonewall riots and the national gay rights movement that followed is eye-opening, unflinching, and inspiring.


Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Lose Learn for Teens: How to Turn a Loss Into a Win. John Maxwell, $17.00

Any setback — a championship loss, a bad grade, a botched audition — can be seen as a step forward when teens possess the right tools to turn that loss into a gain of knowledge. Drawing on years of leadership experience, Dr. Maxwell provides a roadmap for becoming a true learner, someone who wins in the face of problems, failures, and losses. This Young Readers edition features all-new stories of real life figures that overcame adversity early in their lives, including entrepreneur Steve Jobs, Olympic Gold Medalists Gabby Douglas and Mikaela Shiffrin, and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai. 


Walking Home. Eric Walters, $12.99 (novel)

13-year-old Muchoki and his younger sister, Jata, can barely recognize what's become of their lives. Only weeks ago they lived in a bustling Kenyan village, going to school, playing soccer with friends, and helping at their parents' store. But sudden political violence has killed their father and destroyed their home. Now, Muchoki, Jata, and their ailing mother live in a tent in an overcrowded refugee camp. By day, they try to fend off hunger and boredom. By night, their fears about the future are harder to keep at bay. Driven by both hope and desperation, Muchoki and Jata set off on what seems like an impossible journey: to walk hundreds of kilometers to find their last remaining family.


This Book is Gay. James Dawson, $12.99

A funny and pertinent book about being lesbian, bisexual, gay, queer, transgender or just curious — for everybody, no matter their gender or sexuality. Former PSHCE teacher and acclaimed YA author James Dawson gives an uncensored look at what it's like to grow up as LGBT. Including testimonials from people across the gender and sexual spectrums, this frank, funny, fully inclusive book explores everything anyone who ever dared to wonder wants to know — from sex to politics, how to pull, stereotypes, how to come-out and more. Spike Gerrell's hilarious illustrations combined with funny and factual text make this a must-read.


To This Day: For the Bullied and Beautiful. Shane Koyczan, illustrated by various artists, $19.95

In February 2013, Shane Koyczan’s passionate anti-bullying poem “To This Day” electrified the world. An animated video of the lyric narrative went viral, racking up over 12 million hits to date and inspiring an international movement against bullying in schools. Shane later performed the piece to sustained applause on the stage of the 2013 annual TED Conference. Now this extraordinary work has been adapted into an equally moving and visually arresting book. Thirty international artists, as diverse as they are talented, have been inspired to create exceptional art to accompany “To This Day.” Each page is a vibrant collage of images, colors and words that will resonate powerfully with anyone who has experienced bullying themselves, whether as a victim, observer, or participant. Born of Shane’s own experiences of being bullied as a child, To This Day expresses the profound and lasting effect of bullying on an individual, while affirming the strength and inner resources that allow people to move beyond the experience. A heartfelt preface and afterword, along with resources for kids affected by bullying, make this book an invaluable centerpiece of the anti-bullying movement.


Courage for Beginners. Karen Harrington, $8.00 (novel)

Seventh grade is not turning out the way Mysti had planned. Her father is in the hospital, her mother is afraid to leave the house, and Mysti's best friend has abandoned her for the cool hipster crowd at school. Does Mysti have the courage to change her story?


Some Assembly Required: the Not-So-Secret Life of a Transgender Teen. Arin Andrews, $21.99 (Ages 14 +)

We’ve all felt uncomfortable in our own skin at some point, and we’ve all been told that “it’s just a part of growing up.” But for Arin Andrews, it wasn’t a phase that would pass. He had been born in the body of a girl and there seemed to be no relief in sight. In this revolutionary memoir, Arin details the journey that led him to make the life-transforming decision to undergo gender reassignment as a high school junior. In his captivatingly witty, honest voice, Arin reveals the challenges he faced as a girl, the humiliation and anger he felt after getting kicked out of his private school, and all the changes — both mental and physical — he experienced once his transition began.

Some Assembly Required is a true coming-of-age story about knocking down obstacles and embracing family, friendship, and first love. But more than that, it is a reminder that self-acceptance does not come ready-made with a manual and spare parts. Rather, some assembly is always required.


Moon at Nine. Deborah Ellis, $16.95 (novel)

Fifteen-year-old Farrin has many secrets. Although she goes to a school for gifted girls in Tehran, as the daughter of an aristocratic mother and wealthy father, Farrin must keep a low profile. It is 1988; ever since the Shah was overthrown, the deeply conservative and religious government controls every facet of life in Iran. If the Revolutionary Guard finds out about her mother’s Bring Back the Shah activities, her family could be thrown in jail, or worse. The day she meets Sadira, Farrin’s life changes forever. Sadira is funny, wise, and outgoing; the two girls become inseparable. But as their friendship deepens into romance, the relationship takes a dangerous turn. It is against the law to be gay in Iran; the punishment is death. Despite their efforts to keep their love secret, the girls are discovered and arrested. Separated from Sadira, Farrin can only pray as she awaits execution. Will her family find a way to save them both?

Based on real-life events, multi-award winning author Deborah Ellis’s new book is a tense and riveting story about a world where homosexuality is considered so abhorrent that it is punishable by death.


Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened. Allie Brosh, $23.99

Every time Allie Brosh posts something new on her hugely popular blog Hyperbole and a Half the internet rejoices. Touching, absurd, and darkly comic, Allie Brosh’s highly anticipated book HYPERBOLE AND A HALF showcases her unique voice, leaping wit, and her ability to capture complex emotions with deceptively simple illustrations.

This full-color, beautifully illustrated edition features more than fifty percent new content, with ten never-before-seen essays and one wholly revised and expanded piece as well as classics from the website like, “The God of Cake,” “Dogs Don’t Understand Basic Concepts Like Moving,” and her astonishing, “Adventures in Depression,” and “Depression Part Two,” which have been hailed as some of the most insightful meditations on the disease ever written.


Would You Mind? Robert Joseph Greene, $11.50 (novel)

Nate Lawson didn't know the kid of parents he had until he fell in love with another guy in high school. WOULD YOU MIND? is the story of how a family can sometimes surprise you and give you the best gift of all — their love and acceptance.


Picture Me. Lori Weber, $12.95 (novel, ages 13+)

When a well-meaning English teacher has overweight student Krista read aloud a poem about body image titled "Barbie Doll" in class, she ignites a simmering bullying event based on Krista's appearance. Krista's best friend, and witness to the event, Tessa, is suspended for fighting to defend her friend. The girl who bullies Krista seems unaffected by the incident at school and more concerned with what an older guy thinks of her. But as the three characters' paths intersect, their inner lives are revealed. Each emerges as a much more complicated individual than their simple bully, target, and witness labels.


LGBTQ Families: the Ultimate Teen Guide. Eva Apelqvist, $55.00 (ages 13+)

LGBTQ FAMILIES: THE ULTIMATE TEEN GUIDE focuses on the difficulties young people face as members of households in which one or more members are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, or queer/questioning. This book offers encouragement, insights, and resources to help them cope with and embrace the uniqueness of their family life. Teens and adults from LGBTQ families — and teens who identify as LGBTQ themselves — tell their personal stories and share strategies they use to deal with a sometimes unaccepting society. Topics discussed include politics, religion, media, and bullying.

Aimed at young adults with LGBTQ parents, teens who identify as LGBTQ, those who support LGBTQs, and anyone wanting to educate themselves on the topic, this book will broaden understanding and enable teens and their peers to embrace the diversity of the modern family.


Until Today. Pam Fluttert, $12.95 (novel, ages 13+)

No one knows Kat’s secret, and the only place she confides the truth is in her journal.  But now the journal is missing, and Kat is terrified that everyone will find out the secret she has been keeping for years — a friend of her parents has been abusing her since she was a little girl.

Will people hate her and blame her for what’s been happening? Or is this her chance to finally go from victim to survivor?


The Silent Summer of Kyle McGinley. Jan Andrews, $14.95 (novel, ages 13+)

Kyle McGinley doesn’t say a word. Fed up with being shuttled from one foster care home to another, he has stopped speaking. But at the home of Jill and Scott Wardman, with the help of a crow, and a swamp, and an excess of black paint, he begins to think maybe — just maybe — life could get better.


BASODEE: an Anthology Dedicated to Black Youth. Edited by Fiona Raye Clarke, $20.00

Are you feeling Basodee?

This honest portrayal of Canadian-Black relations is a passionate and eye-opening collection of youth poems, essays, and stories exploring experiences of culture shock, stereotyping, family, and the facts and fictions of Black Canadian history.


PRESSURE: True Stories by Teens about Stress. Edited by Al Desetta, $14.50

Stress hits these teens from all angles: pressure at school, at home, and in their relationships. The writers in this book on teens and stress describe their stress-relief techniques, including exercise, music, writing, and more, and offer inspiring examples of perseverance. Their stories of teens and stress captivate and inspire.


RAGE: True Stories by Teens about Anger. Edited by Laura Longhine, $13.50

These teens have plenty of reasons to be angry: parental abuse, street violence, peer pressure, powerlessness, and more. The writers talk honestly about anger management for teens as they struggle to gain control of their emotions and stop hurting others and themselves.


VICIOUS: True Stories by Teens about Bullying. Edited by Hope Vanderberg, $13.50

The essays on teenage bullying in VICIOUS address every form of bullying: physical, verbal, relational, and cyber. These stories will appeal to readers because the writers’ cruelty and hurt are unmistakably real—and the writers’ stories are at times painful, often admirable, and always compelling for the resilience they reveal.


It Was the Worst of Times … Then It Got Worse: High School Stories and Survival Tips. Philippe de Jocas, $18.95

Philippe de Jocas, 17, explores the tangled and often confusing world of high school. Read about school projects gone disastrously awry, warfare in the school halls, the bizarre student council elections and more from the perspective of this smart, funny and self-confessed socially awkward geeky teen.

Funny and strange, It Was the Worst of Times will resonate with everyone who has ever tiptoed through the school halls, hoping to stay invisible.


Autism, the Invisible Cord: a Sibling's Diary. Barbara Cain, $13.50 (novel, ages 12-18)

Meet Jenny — a teen who confides in her diary about what it is like to live with Ezra, her younger brother with autism, and her life with the most "wacky, exasperating, infuriating, amazing younger brother!"

If living with Ezra weren't hard enough, Jenny must deal with school bullies, rude classmates, and fragile friendships. But with the promise of a summer writing program and an Ezra-inspired project, Jenny finds the courage to be more than just "Ezra's sister, protector, defender, and his best and only friend," and loosens the invisible cord just enough to follow her own dreams.


True Blue. Deborah Ellis, $17.95

Casey and Jess were best friends forever. But now Casey has been arrested for murder. Of course it's a mistake. Stephanie Grass was the brattiest kid at camp; Casey and Jess weren't the only counselors who complained about her. Sure, Casey used to joke about killing the kid, but she wasn't serious. While the whole town takes sides and waits for the trial, Jess finds herself the center of attention. Everyone wants to know what happened that summer. They are hanging on every word. But does anyone really care about Jess? The truth is, without Casey, Jess feels left behind. And she doesn't like it one bit.

An enthralling read that is part psychological suspense, part murder mystery, TRUE BLUE looks at the darker side of friendship and the inner world of an emotionally detached teenager who struggles to find the moral courage to remain loyal to a friend in trouble.


I.D. Stuff That Happens to Define Us. Kate Scowen & Peter Mitchell, $12.95

I.D. offers 12 first-person accounts about life’s pivotal moments — those universal experiences from our youth that mar us, mold us and make us who we are.


I Am an Emotional Creature: the Secret Life of Girls Around the World. Eve Ensler, $15.00

In this book, internationally acclaimed author and playwright Eve Ensler offers fictional monologues and stories inspired by girls around the globe. Fierce, tender and smart, I Am an Emotional Creature is a celebration of the authentic voice inside every girl and an inspiring call to action for girls everywhere to speak up, follow their dreams and become the women they were meant to be.


The road to god knows … a graphic novel. Von Allen, $14.95

The road to god knows … is the story of Marie, a teenage girl coming to grips with her mother’s schizophrenia. There’s no handbook, no guide to help her deal with what life throws at her as she struggles to grow up fast, and wrestles with poverty, loneliness and her mother’s illness.


The Omnivore’s Dilemma: the Secrets Behind What You Eat, Young Reader’s Edition. Michael Pollan, $12.50

Based on the bestseller “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: a Natural History of Four Meals”, author Michael Pollan takes young readers behind the scenes of the food industry to learn the realities and the politics of how our food gets to the table.


Everything's Okay: My Journey Surviving Childhood Cancer. Alesia Shute, illustrated by Nathan Lueth, $15.95 (graphic novel)

When Alesia Shute was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 7, her life was redirected as was that of her entire family. She would go on to survive six major surgeries that had never been tested on a child, several minor surgeries and countless hours of pain and months of hospitalization. Alesia had to grow up quickly and adjust to being sickly and different from others. EVERYTHING IS OKAY is her story of survival that details not only her recovery, but also her struggles through school, adolescence, boys, marriage, and pregnancy, with some hilarious tales of her adult life to boot.


First Crossing: Stories about Teen Immigrants. Edited by Donald Gallo, $11.50

Here are ten unique short stories that reflect the difficulties teen immigrants face in trying to please family and fit in with their new surroundings.


Absolutely, Positively Not. David Larochelle, $11.50

Steven doesn’t know if he’ll pass his driver’s test or if he’ll ever understand his parents, but there’s one thing he knows for sure: He’s absolutely, positively NOT gay.  Right?

A funny and poignant look at the life of a boy who’s finding out what it means to be himself.


The Teen Guide to Global Action: How to Connect with Others (Near and Far) to Create Social Change. Barbara Lewis, $16.50

Kids everywhere are deciding they can’t wait to become adults to change the world. They’re acting right now to fight hunger and poverty, promote health and human rights, save the environment, and work for peace. Their stories prove that young people can make a difference on a global scale. This book includes real-life stories to inspire young readers, plus a rich and varied menu of opportunities for service, fast facts, hands-on activities, user-friendly tools, and up-to-date resources kids can use to put their own volunteer spirit into practice. It also spotlights young people from the past whose efforts led to significant positive change. Upbeat, practical, and highly motivating, this book has the power to rouse young readers everywhere.


See our Parenting Teens booklist for adult titles.

Saying Good-bye to London. Julie Burtinshaw, $12.95 (novel)

Francis is a shy 15-year-old when he meets edgy, confident 16-year-old Sawyer at a party. Sparks fly... and Sawyer gets pregnant. They hardly know each other, but now must deal with both their relationship and the reality of a baby. Francis has a lot of growing up to do, and now it seems like he is being forced to do it all at once. When his life collides with Sawyer’s, Francis is forced to confront his own stereotypes about loss, sexuality, and family. Sawyer decides to give the baby up for adoption, but that’s just the start.

Over the months they wait for the baby to be born, Francis and Sawyer try to deal with their choices. Will Francis follow Sawyer’s brave example? Or will he turn his back and pretend his life has not changed? Where will they be when it’s time to say good-bye to baby London?


THE EMOTIONARY n. a dictionary of words that don't exist for feelings that do. Eden Sher & Julia Wertz, $25.95

All her life, Eden Sher has suffered from dyscommunicatia (n. the inability to articulate a feeling through words.). Then, one day, she decided that, whenever she had an emotion for which she had no word, she would make one up.  The result of this is The Emotionary, which lives at the intersection of incredibly funny and very useful. Chock full of words you always wanted/never knew you needed, often accompanied by illustrations of hilarious and all-too-familiar situations, The Emotionary will be a cherished tool for you or the world-class feelings-haver in your life.


Navigating Life: Things I Wish My Mother Had Told Me. Margaux Bergen, $35.00

You learn a few useful things at school — the three Rs come in handy, and it’s good to know how to perform under pressure and wait your turn — but most of what matters, what makes you into a functioning human being, able to hold your own in conversation, find your path, know what to avoid in relationships and secure a meaningful job, no teacher will ever tell you. This diamond-sharp, gut-punchingly honest book of hard-earned wisdom is one mother’s effort to equip her daughter for survival in the real world.

“I am not writing this to groom or guide you to professional or academic success,” she writes. “My goal is rather to give you tools that might help you engage with the world and flourish... Think of this as a kind of developing bath-time wisdom.”

Wise, heartbreakingly funny, and resonantly true, Navigating Life has invaluable lessons for students of life of all ages. It will challenge you to lead a more meaningful life and to tackle the bumps along the way with grace, grit, style, and ingenuity.


The Loose Ends List: a Novel of Firsts and Lasts. Carrie Firestone, $21.49

Seventeen-year-old Maddie O'Neill Levine lives a charmed life, and is primed to spend the perfect pre-college summer with her best friends and young-at-heart socialite grandmother (also Maddie's closest confidante), tying up high school loose ends. Maddie's plans change the instant Gram announces that she is terminally ill and has booked the family on a secret "death with dignity" cruise ship so that she can leave the world in her own unconventional way — and give the O'Neill clan an unforgettable summer of dreams-come-true in the process.

Soon, Maddie is on the trip of a lifetime with her over-the-top family. As they travel the globe, Maddie bonds with other passengers and falls for Enzo, who is processing his own grief. But despite the laughter, headiness of first love, and excitement of glamorous destinations, Maddie knows she is on the brink of losing Gram. She struggles to find the strength to say good-bye in a whirlwind summer shaped by love, loss, and the power of forgiveness.


The Tapping Solution for Teenage Girls: How to Stop Freaking Out and Start Being Awesome. Christine Wheeler, $15.99

Dealing with grades, bullying, friendships, parents, crushes... it's enough to make any teenage girl wish she could snap her fingers and make it all go away. The good news is, you almost can-except it's not snapping" but "tapping"! Formally known as Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), this revolutionary practice can help you reduce your feelings of anxiety and overwhelm, boost your confidence, and unpack the "stress backpack" you may not even know you're carrying.

In The Tapping Solution for Teenage Girls, expert EFT practitioner Christine Wheeler explains the basics of the technique (it actually involves tapping, with your fingers, on energy points on your own body, and you can do it anywhere, anytime). Then she gives you simple yet powerful instructions for tapping on common challenges such as:

  • Schoolwork, tests, grades, and planning for college
  • Appearance and body image
  • Dating, breakups, and dealing with sexual feelings
  • Divorce, siblings, and blended families

Throughout the book, comments from 16-year-old Cassidy, the author's teen consultant, keep it real with helpful perspectives on how this tapping thing works! In these pages, you'll discover that a super effective tool for dealing with stress is literally at your fingertips. If you're ready to be true to yourself, stop freaking out, and keep being awesome, The Tapping Solution for Teenage Girls is the perfect solution for you.


The Hill. Karen Bass, $14.95

Jared’s plane has crashed in the Alberta wilderness, and Kyle is first on the scene. When Jared insists on hiking up the highest hill in search of cell phone reception, Kyle hesitates; his Cree grandmother has always forbidden him to go near it. There’s no stopping Jared, though, so Kyle reluctantly follows. After a night spent on the hilltop — with no cell service — the teens discover something odd: the plane has disappeared. Nothing in the forest surrounding them seems right. In fact, things seem very wrong. And worst of all, something is hunting them.


The Last Leaves Falling. Sarah Benwell, $19.99 (novel)

A teen grapples with ALS and his decision to die in this devastatingly beautiful debut novel infused with the haunting grace of samurai death poetry and the noble importance of friendship. 

Abe Sora is going to die, and he’s only seventeen years old. Diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), he’s already lost the use of his legs, which means he can no longer attend school. Seeking a sense of normality, Sora visits teen chat rooms online and finally finds what he’s been longing for: friendship without pity. 


The V-Word: True Stories about First-Time Sex. Amber Keyser, $14.99

First time sex is a big unknown. Will it be candlelight and rose petals or quick and uncomfortable? Is it about love or about lust? Deciding to have sex for the first time is a choice that’s often fraught with anxiety and joy. But do you have anyone telling you what sex is really like? An honest and poignant collection of essays by women about losing their virginity in their teens. The V-Word captures the complexity of this important life-decision and reflects diverse real-world experiences. Includes helpful resources for parents and teens.

In The V-Word seventeen writers pull back the sheets and tell all, covering everything from straight sex to queer sex, diving-in versus waiting, and even the exhilaration and disappointment that blankets it all. Some of their experiences happened too soon, some at just the right time, but all paint a broad picture of what first-time sex is really like. Funny, hot, meaningful, cringe-worthy, gross, forgettable, magnificent, empowering, and transformative, the stories in The V-Word are never preachy, but provide a map for teens to chart their own course through the steamy waters of sex. With The V-Word girls can finally take control, learn what’s on the horizon, and eliminate the fear and mystery surrounding this important milestone.


Do You Think This Is Strange? Aaron Cully Drake, $17.95 (novel)

Freddy is having a rough year. First, he is expelled from school for fighting. Now, at his new school, he is required to have regular conversations with a counselor — an awkward situation for anyone, really, but even more so for Freddy, who has autism. Not only that, Freddy’s mom left years ago and his dad drinks too much.

But then Saskia — a fair-haired girl Freddy hasn’t seen in ten years — appears at his new school. As children they attended the same group therapy sessions, and now she is hardly the same person he remembers. She doesn’t smile. And she doesn’t talk. But their reunion provides him with respite in a difficult time, and sets a chain of meetings and events into motion that reveals long-repressed memories and brings Freddy to a unexpectedly freeing moment of truth. A funny and touching coming-of-age story you won’t forget.


Yoga Girls' Club: Do Yoga, Make Art, Be You. Tiffani Bryant, $19.95

A fun, interactive workbook for girls aged 11-17 containing 43 easy-to-follow yoga postures, guidance on yogic breathing and meditation, opportunities for self-reflection and fun art activities. Designed to help girls feel more confident in body and mind and better equipped to handle the everyday pressures of the challenging teenage years.


In Their Shoes: Extraordinary Women Describe Their Amazing Careers. Deborah Reber, $15.99

Follow in the footsteps of amazing women who have the jobs of your dreams! This extensive and empowering career guide leads the way to a fulfilling professional life. Newly updated with seven additional cutting-edge careers.

Go beyond the job description and get the scoop on what it’s really like to work as a senator, a marine biologist, an actress, and much, much more. This exciting guide gives the behind-the-scenes scoop on a wide variety of careers through nearly fifty intimate “day in the life” profiles of women who excel in their fields. From magazine journalism to forensic science to the most relevant new careers for today’s young women, you’ll learn exactly what to expect and how to get ahead. In addition to providing specific, easily relatable information about a wide variety of possible professions, In Their Shoes also offers interview excerpts, practical tips, and career planning advice. Whether you’re looking for your first job or your fifth, it’s never too early (or too late) to decide what you want to be when you grow up!


Speaking OUT: Queer Youth in Focus. Rachelle Lee Smith, $17.99

Speaking OUT: Queer Youth in Focus is a photographic essay that explores a wide spectrum of experiences told from the perspective of a diverse group of young people, ages fourteen to twenty-four, identifying as queer (i.e., lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning). Portraits are presented without judgment or stereotype by eliminating environmental influence with a stark white backdrop. This backdrop acts as a blank canvas, where each subject’s personal thoughts are handwritten onto the final photographic print. With more than sixty-five portraits photographed over a period of ten years, Speaking OUT provides rare insight into the passions, confusions, prejudices, joys, and sorrows felt by queer youth.


Be More Chill. Ned Vizzini, $9.99

Jeremy Heere is your average high school dork. Day after day, he stares at beautiful Christine, the girl he can never have, and dryly notes the small humiliations that come his way.... until the day he finds out about the "squip." This pill-sized supercomputer, when swallowed, is guaranteed to bring you whatever you most desire in life.

By instructing him on everything from what to wear to how to talk and walk, the squip transforms Jeremy from Supergeek into one of the most popular guys in class. Soon he is friends with his former tormentors and has the attention of the hottest girls in school. But Jeremy eventually discovers that there is also a dark side to having a computer inside your brain, and it can have disastrous consequences.


I Am Malala, Young Readers Edition. Malala Yousafzai, with Patricia McCormick, $13.49

Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren't allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn't go to school. This is her story — the story of how one girl stood up for education and changed the world.


Fish in a Tree. Lynda Mullaly Hunt, $22.99 (novel)

Ally has been smart enough to fool a lot of smart people. Every time she lands in a new school, she is able to hide her inability to read by creating clever yet disruptive distractions.  She is afraid to ask for help; after all, how can you cure dumb? However, her newest teacher Mr. Daniels sees the bright, creative kid underneath the trouble maker. With his help, Ally learns not to be so hard on herself and that dyslexia is nothing to be ashamed of. As her confidence grows, Ally feels free to be herself and the world starts opening up with possibilities. She discovers that there’s a lot more to her — and to everyone — than a label, and that great minds don’t always think alike.


Dreaming in Indian: Contemporary Native Voices. Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale, $14.95

A powerful and visually stunning anthology from some of the most groundbreaking Native artists working in North America today. Truly universal in its themes, Dreaming In Indian will shatter commonly held stereotypes and challenge readers to rethink their own place in the world. Emerging and established Native artists, including acclaimed author Joseph Boyden, renowned visual artist Bunky Echo Hawk, and stand-up comedian Ryan McMahon, contribute thoughtful and heartfelt pieces on their experiences growing up Indigenous, expressing them through such mediums as art, food, the written word, sport, dance, and fashion.

Whether addressing the effects of residential schools, calling out bullies through personal manifestos, or simply citing hopes for the future, Dreaming In Indian refuses to shy away from difficult topics. Insightful, thought-provoking, and beautifully honest, this book will to appeal to young adult readers.


Rethinking Normal: a Memoir in Transition. Katie Rain Hill, $21.99

Katie never felt comfortable in her own skin. She realized very young that a serious mistake had been made; she was a girl who had been born in the body of a boy. Suffocating under her peers’ bullying and the mounting pressure to be “normal,” Katie tried to take her life at the age of eight years old. After several other failed attempts, she finally understood that “Katie” — the girl trapped within her — was determined to live.

In this first-person account, Katie reflects on her pain-filled childhood and the events leading up to the life-changing decision to undergo gender reassignment as a teenager. She reveals the unique challenges she faced while unlearning how to be a boy and shares what it was like to navigate the dating world and experience heartbreak for the first time in a body that matched her gender identity. Told in an unwaveringly honest voice, Rethinking Normal is a coming-of-age story about transcending physical appearances and redefining the parameters of “normalcy” to embody one’s true self.


Dating! 10 Helpful Tips for a Successful Relationship. Laura Buddenberg & Alesia Montgomery, $13.95

Healthy, happy relationships aren’t random — it all comes down to skills, knowledge, and choices. This book will help you think about your own experiences and answer some important questions — how do you know when you’re in a good relationship? Are you in a relationship for the right reasons? What do you want in a relationship?

In each chapter you’ll read a relationship story. Some of these are positive, some are not. All of the stories offer some wisdom on how to create or maintain a healthy relationship — or recognize when it’s time to end an unhealthy one.


Being a Teen: Everything Teen Girls & Boys Should Know about Relationships, Sex, Love, Health, Identity & More. Jane Fonda, $20.00

This thorough, concise guide offers straight talk about:

  • The male and female body as it changes and matures
  • Teen relationships: what it takes to create happy, supportive, positive, and meaningful connections with family, friends, and others
  • Identity empowerment: how to be authentic and thrive in today’s world
  • Sex and sexuality for boys and girls: how teens should take care of their bodies, embrace their experiences, and strengthen self-esteem
  • Strategies for working through the toughest challenges, including bullying, sexual abuse, eating disorders, pregnancy, and more  

Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out. Susan Kuklin, $15.00

Author and photographer Susan Kuklin met and interviewed six transgender or gender-neutral young adults and used her considerable skills to represent them thoughtfully and respectfully before, during, and after their personal acknowledgment of gender preference. Portraits, family photographs, and candid images grace the pages, augmenting the emotional and physical journey each youth has taken. Each honest discussion and disclosure, whether joyful or heartbreaking, is completely different from the other because of family dynamics, living situations, gender, and the transition these teens make in recognition of their true selves. A groundbreaking work of LGBT literature takes an honest look at the life, love, and struggles of transgender teens.


I Am J. Cris Beam, $12.00 (novel, ages 13+)

J had always felt different. He was certain that eventually everyone would understand who he really was: a boy mistakenly born as a girl. Yet as he grew up, his body began to betray him; eventually J stopped praying to wake up a "real boy" and started covering up his body, keeping himself invisible – from his parents, from his friends, from the world. But after being deserted by the best friend he thought would always be by his side, J decides that he's done hiding — it's time to be who he really is. And this time he is determined not to give up, no matter the cost.


Break These Rules: 35 YA Authors on Speaking Up, Standing Out, and Being Yourself. Edited by Luke Reynolds, $13.95 (ages 13+)

Middle grades and young adult authors speak candidly on the unspoken “rules” of adolescence in this collection of moving, inspiring, and often funny essays. This unique volume encourages readers to break with conformity and defy age-old, and typically inaccurate, orthodoxy—including such conventions as Boys can’t be gentle, kind, or caring; One must wear Abercrombie & Fitch in order to fit in; Girls should act like girls; and One must go to college after finishing high school.


(You) Set Me on Fire: a Story about School, about Fire, and about Love. Mariko Tamaki, $16.00 (novel)

Allison Lee is seventeen and off to college in the fall. So far, she's been in love once (total catastrophe) and on fire twice (also pretty bad). Both love and fire have left their scars.

Looking a little more burnt chicken and a little less radiant phoenix, Allison takes up residence in Dylan Hall (a.k.a. Dyke Hall) at St. Joseph's College, where she discovers the true gift of freshman year: the opportunity to reinvent yourself. Miles away from the high school she's happy to leave behind, her all-female dorm is a strange new world, home to new social circles and challenges. Allison still feels like the odd girl out ... until Shar appears. Beautiful and blinding, Shar quickly becomes the sun at the centre of Allison's universe, drawing her in with dangerous allure. Will Allison get burned again? And, if she does ... what kind of scars will she earn this time?


The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen. Susin Nielsen, $19.99

This deeply moving novel looks at the ultimate cost of bullying — with a cast of fabulous characters, dark humour, and a lovable, difficult protagonist struggling to come to terms with the horrible crime his brother has committed.


War Brothers: the Graphic Novel. Sharon McKay & Daniel Lafrance, $18.95

When fourteen-year-old Jacob is brutally abducted and forced to become a child soldier, he struggles to hold on to his sanity and the will to escape.  Readers will never forget the experiences of this young boy struggling to survive, unsure who to trust, afraid of succumbing to madness, and above all, desperate to get to freedom. In the end, Jacob engineers a daring escape. 

This graphic novel is based on the acclaimed novel of the same title, winner of a 2009 Arthur Ellis award. The author spent time in Uganda and based this story on real-life accounts of the horrors inflicted on child soldiers and their victims. Daniel Lafrance’s striking artwork and the poignant, powerful text capture the very essence of life as a child soldier.


This High School Has Closets. Robert Joseph Greene, $9.95 (novel, ages 14 +)

High school is a challenge for all teens. For Mark Thomas, falling in love, and dealing with becoming an adult, made his senior year of high school both difficult and exhilarating. THIS HIGH SCHOOL HAS CLOSETS is a story of two young teenagers falling in love during a difficult senior year.


Morning Star. Judith Plaxon, $10.95

Two girls, at opposite ends of history.

Flower is an escaped slave who, with her parents and baby brother, makes her way north to Canada via the Underground Railway. Felicia, living 150 years later, is the "new girl" and one of the few black kids in her new school.

When Felicia is asked to research her ancestry for a school project, she wonders if her new friends will want to hear about her family's history as slaves.


Maus: a Survivor’s Tale. Volume I, My Father Bleeds History. Art Spiegelman, $15.95

Maus: a Survivor’s Tale. Volume II, And Here My Troubles Began. Art Spiegelman, $15.95

This is the story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe, and his son, a cartoonist coming to terms with his father’s story. Maus approaches the unspeakable through the diminutive. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), shocks us out of any lingering sense of familiarity and succeeds in “drawing us closer to the bleak heart of the Holocaust” (The New York Times).

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale. Vladek’s harrowing story of survival is woven into the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Against the backdrop of guilt brought by survival, they stage a normal life of small arguments and unhappy visits. This astonishing retelling of our century’s grisliest news is a story of survival, not only of Vladek but of the children who survive even the survivors. Maus studies the bloody pawprints of history and tracks its meaning for all of us.


The Little Black Book for Girlz: a Book on Healthy Sexuality. By Youth, for Youth (St. Stephen’s Community House), $9.95

The Little Black Book for Girlz is a book on healthy sexuality written by girls for girls. A diverse group of urban teens went looking for information about sexuality. They collected stories, poetry, interviews, art and more from other youth and health care workers. The result is an honest, factual look at the physical and emotional issues young women face — a powerful presentation of real-life examples and life-saving info.

The Little Black Book for Guys: Guys Talk about Sex. By Youth for Youth (St. Stephen’s Community House), $9.95

A survival guide to being a guy. Lots of guys talk the big talk, but what’s really going on with sex? That’s what a group of young men sat down to figure out for The Little Black Book for Guys. To get behind the hype, they talked to other teens and collected stories, poems, essays, and art about personal experiences. They also interviewed health professionals to get the facts they need to make healthy choices. The result is a revealing collection of personal thoughts and need-to-know information. Topics include:

• Puberty • Wet dreams • Masturbation • Penis size • Dating • Safer sex and birth control
• Sexually Transmitted Infections / AIDS

Written, illustrated, and designed by youth, and carefully vetted by doctors, The Little Black Book for Guys is more than a book about sex. It’s a snapshot of being a guy at the beginning of the 21st century.

Contains frank descriptions of sexuality and coarse language.


101 Ways to Dance. Kathy Stinson, $9.95 (ages 13 and up)

In this risqué collection, award-winning author for young people Kathy Stinson offers characters and plotlines that reflect the many ways teens learn about lust and love. From the first stirrings of same-sex desire on a lakeside beach to troubling paternity questions around a teen pregnancy, Stinson's stories reflect both the sweetness and the scariness of teenage sexuality. Offers many opportunities for discussion, and also a great choice for reluctant readers. A must-have for all junior high and high school libraries.


In Love and In Danger: a Teen’s Guide to Breaking Free of Abusive Relationships. Barrie Levy, $16.95

This book is for teenagers and parents of teens who have questions about abusive dating relationships. In Love and In Danger helps teens understand abusive dating situations, decide how to deal with them and learn how to get help. Providing useful information, practical advice and revealing interviews with teens, this newly revised edition includes a new afterword for parents and a resource sections with information on books, websites and organizations teens can turn to for help.


The How Rude!™ Handbook of School Manners for Teens: Civility in the Hallowed Halls. Alex Packer, $11.95

What counts as rude behavior in school? What can you do when a teacher is rude? What's the best way to handle bullies and bigots? Here's sound advice (touched with humor) for teens who want to make school more bearable.

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